Supranational Organization

(redirected from Supranational institution)

Supranational Organization

An organization that exists in multiple countries. While, theoretically, supranational could refer to multinational corporations, the term most often describes an international government or quasi-government organization. Examples include the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. Supranational organizations often have a direct role in regulation. For example, an international treaty may set up certain standards for international trade. However, enforcement of these provisions is left to individual, sovereign governments.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EU's obstructive and pernicious political agenda to punish us will be trodden in the dust and we may even see a radical overhaul of the structure, nature and objectives of the EU as a supranational institution. Surely a good thing.
Although the EU's responses to the crisis did not add any new competences to the Commission, the new instruments of economic governance allowed the supranational institution to have a stronger role in macroeconomic governance, namely through the Six-Pack, which has confirmed and strengthened its role in budgetary and economic policy coordination.
BRUSSELS For the past four days of our interactions with some of the select European Union (EU) officials here at the capital city of Belgium, we have come to understand hopefully correctly how complicated it functions as a supranational institution, or transcending borders and boundaries of 28 member states.
A different supranational institution that has largely embraced a
Secondly, it is the first time that a supranational institution is issuing depository receipts on an African Stock Exchange.
It has 47 members (820 million citizens) and a true supranational institution that is the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR).
(139) One could possibly argue that dependence on circumstantial changes in political will can be avoided by delegating the cooperation process to supranational institutions. Although this is true, the process of giving up sovereignty in favor of a supranational institution is, in itself, a complex political process.
Even the European Union, a triumph of supranational institution building, has been hobbled by nationalist sentiments and stereotypes as it struggles to deal with an economic crisis, and nationalist pride increasingly permeates European culture, "from soccer tournaments to the Eurovision Song Contest." In Britain, nationalists demanding a withdrawal from the EU are making impressive headway--and so are Scots who agitate for secession from Britain.
It is the result of the activity of an independent and supranational institution such as the European Parliament, where the parliament members are elected and organise their activity not on behalf of the national governments or parliaments but on the base of their agenda and the agenda of the European political groups they belong to.
"However, as no rated supranational institution has ever called for the support of member countries, such commitments have never been tested," Fitch noted.
The principle of subsidiarity (decisions are to be made at the lowest level possible and the highest level necessary to be effective) may limit its scope but, within the acknowledged areas of its authority, the supranational institution trumps national sovereignty.
This enabled the member states "to act collectively not only to accelerate but also to control economic integration and supranational institution building."(13)