Superstation

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Superstation

A television satellite that broadcasts locally and also uses satellite technology to broadcast nationally. While superstations have become rather uncommon, they were the forerunners to cable television. The technology behind superstations was pioneered by Ted Turner.
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Schoolchildren had a special surprise visit from Santa as the bearded man in red helped celebrate the official opening of Sydneys latest ambulance Superstation.
The material examined was collected by a Sigsbee Trawl, proper for macrobenthos, in the Superstation 8 of the Walvis Ridge Sector (WRS) (Fig.
As the nation's first "superstation," the once anemic WTCG now reached approximately two million cable-television subscribers by 1976.
For instance, the Tribune Company of Chicago already owned the WGN superstation as well as other television and newspaper outlets when it purchased the Cubs.
John wants to protect his (1) personal assets from liabilities resulting from the superstations' operation and (2) newly formed business venture from potential claims of personal creditors.
That's the earliest the superstation has ever laid hands on a comedy with the Nielsen potential of a "Will & Grace," encouraging WGN to raise its revenue estimates for next season.
The committee has made a separate proposal to close Atherstone court whether the "superstations" are built or not, but the cabinet has opposed it.
Under the current rate structure, satellite carriers pay 6 cents a month per subscriber for network signals, 14 cents for stations that have national rights to all of their syndicated programming and 17.5 cents for superstations.
For both cable operators and their competitors, an important programming category is superstations, which are independent broadcast stations imported from outside the multichannel video distributors' local market area.
Argentina has only 43 stand-alone TV broadcasters, five of them superstations, and 95 privately-owned radio stations, a pittance compared with the pay-TV market.
More movies, sports, police dramas, and sitcom re-runs on USA and access to cable by 1984--the superstations such as WTBS and WGN.
"The Detroit stations are our 'superstations,' primarily for the entertainment programming," says Johnston.