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Related to Superelevation: centrifugal force

Bank

An institution that provides a great variety of financial services. At their most basic, banks hold money on behalf of customers, which is payable to the customer on demand, either by appearing at the bank for a withdrawal or by writing a check to a third party. Banks use the money they hold to finance loans, which they make to businesses and individuals to pay for operations, mortgages, education expenses, and any number of other things. Many banks also perform other services for a fee; for instance they offer certified checks to customers guaranteeing payment to third parties. In some countries they may provide investment and insurance services. With the exception of Islamic banks, they pay interest on deposits and receive interest on their loans. Banks are regulated by the laws and central banks of their home countries; normally they must receive a charter to engage in business. Banks are usually organized as corporations.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

bank

a deposit-taking institution which is licensed by the monetary authorities of a country (the BANK OF ENGLAND in the UK) to act as a repository for money deposited by persons, companies and institutions, and which undertakes to repay such deposits either immediately on demand or subject to due notice being given. Banks perform various services for their customers (money transmission, investment advice, etc.) and lend out money deposited with them in the form of loans and overdrafts or use their funds to purchase financial securities, in order to operate at a profit. There are many types of banks, including COMMERCIAL BANKS, MERCHANT BANKS, SAVINGS BANKS and INVESTMENT BANKS. See BANKING SYSTEM, BANK OF ENGLAND, CENTRAL BANK.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

bank

a deposit-taking institution that is licensed by the monetary authorities of a country (the BANK OF ENGLAND in the UK) to act as a repository for money deposited by persons, companies and institutions, and which undertakes to repay such deposits either immediately on demand (CURRENT ACCOUNT 2) or subject to due notice being given (DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS). Banks perform various services for their customers (money transmission, investment advice, etc.) and lend out money deposited with them in the form of loans and overdrafts or use their funds to purchase financial securities in order to operate at a profit. There are many types of banks, including COMMERCIAL BANKS, MERCHANT BANKS, SAVINGS BANKS and INVESTMENT BANKS. In recent years many BUILDING SOCIETIES have also established a limited range of banking facilities. See BANKING SYSTEM, CENTRAL BANK, FINANCIAL SYSTEM.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

bank

An institution empowered by law to receive deposits, cash checks or drafts, discount commercial paper,make loans,and issue promissory notes payable to the bearer,known as bank notes. American commercial banks fall into two categories:(1) federally chartered and (2) state chartered. Federally chartered banks come under the regulatory and auditing supervision of the United States Comptroller of the Currency.State-chartered banks come under the control of the appropriate state banking authority.Typically the FDIC will audit state-chartered banks and the comptroller's office will audit federally chartered banks.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Segel, "Side Friction for Superelevation on Horizontal Curves," Rep.
Equation (1) regards debris flow as a moving whole which treats a debris flow as a highly idealized frictionless point mass and calculates the superelevation of debris flow climbing ascending slopes as the height of the debris flow center of gravity (as a whole, [h.sub.0]), whereas the actual superelevation of debris flow climbing ascending slopes is the edge height of the mud depth from the surface of the debris flow h, [h.sub.0] < h (as shown in Figure 1).
where: [v.sup.2]--train speed in the curve, km/h; R--curve radius, m; h--actual superelevation, mm.
The range being the same, also the optronic package remains that of the single-weapon system, and here too superelevation allows decoupling optronic sensors and weapons.
5), a fixed deviation from the superelevation rate (e) of 0.01 was introduced for every trial in conjunction with a deviation of variable ([alpha]) between [0.sup.c] and [6.sup.c].
The 2D method overestimates the ASD due to disregarding the 3D features such as the effect of superelevation, the existence of other near vertical curves, or the overlapping with a crest vertical curve.
Obviously, driving at curve section with superelevation is less safe and faces more safety concern caused by sight distance especially at with small horizontal radii (Dissceti 2010).
However, the most effective way of declining the centrifugal force is to give the slope in width superelevation to the curve in the road.
Another event involved litigation against SCDOT concerning superelevation on the interstates, which highlighted the vulnerability of SCDOT for roadway safety from a business perspective.
Future research is necessary to determine the feasibility of casting horizontal curves or pavement sections with significant changes in superelevation. Another area for further study is the variety of base conditions upon which precast panels can be placed.