Super Bowl indicator

Super Bowl indicator

A theory that if a team from the old American Football League pre-1970 wins the Super Bowl, the stock market will decline during the coming year. If a team from the old pre-1990 National Football League wins the Super Bowl, stock prices will increase in the coming year.

Super Bowl Rule

An indicator that few follow seriously stating that a Super Bowl win by an NFC team will result in a market uptrend for the coming year, while a win by an AFC team portends a downtrend. The Super Bowl indicator has been correct more than four years out of every five, but most believe this to be simply coincidence.
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The Super Bowl indicator suggests that stocks rise for the full year when the Super Bowl winner comes from the original National Football League, but when an original American Football League team wins, stocks fall.
An example of correlation is the Super Bowl Indicator, which is highly correlated at 82 percent.
I put zero stock in the Super Bowl indicator," he said in an interview.
Regardless of the naysayers, the senior Stovall says he enjoys tracking statistics like the Super Bowl indicator.
com)-- The Super Bowl Indicator claims that the DJIA goes up for the year as a whole when the winner comes from the original National Football League, but when an original American Football League or expansion team wins, the DJIA falls.
8220;But the Super Bowl Indicator might be starting to lose some of its 'Lucky Rabbit's Foot' powers,” points out Geraci Jr.
The Super Bowl indicator holds that a victory by an NFC team or an original (pre-1970 merger) NFL team - the Browns, Colts and Steelers - would point to a bullish market for the following year.
Put bluntly, it doesn't matter and given enough time, the Super Bowl indicator will lose its accuracy.
Another and simpler way to look at the Super Bowl indicator, Detrick says, is to look at the average gain for the Dow after the NFC wins vs.