Blue Law

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Blue Law

A law intended to enforce religious morality. In general, blue laws refer to public observance of holy days through the restriction of commerce. While most blue laws in the United States have been repealed, many states restrict the sale of alcohol on Sunday, the Christian Sabbath. Other countries have similar restrictions on Jewish, Islamic and other holidays.
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Moreover, by the early years of the new century, there was clear evidence that some members of the British establishment doubted the validity of the Sunday laws as they pertained to the baking industry.
in the end, the Constitution of 1778 declared that the Christian religion was the official one; b) in the interim of the segregation of the Carolinas, already enjoying a certain amount of autonomy, its assembly passed the Sunday Laws of 1692 and 1712.
Before 1900 the Sunday laws posed a huge problem for many people who desired to view a match of the increasingly popular game of professional base-ball.
In identifying a secular purpose for the Sunday law, it is not surprising that Harlan did not cite Holy Trinity or discuss whether Sabbath laws could be supported on grounds that America was a Christian nation.
On Sunday, December 3, 1882, a day described by the New York Times as one "long to be remembered in the history of this City," (1) New York's finest took to the streets and with great zeal arrested 137 persons for various violations of the newly codified "Crimes against the Person and Against Public Decency and Good Morals," otherwise known as the Sunday Laws.
During that meeting in December of 1888, Blair's committee held a second hearing on the bill for a national Sunday law.
From as early as 1816, Jews began to challenge Sunday laws in numerous states: Virginia, South Carolina, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Louisiana.
19) In the decades following the Civil War organizations such as the National Liberal League and the American Secular Union used publications and political efforts to oppose Sunday laws and to promote the secularization of public life.
Growing into its full stature in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, these Adventists confronted Sunday laws on every side.
Ringgold examining the Sunday laws in the United States.
For example, Christian concern about Sunday laws should not be based on a particular idea of how a Christian should spend Sunday, but on the good it does to people to have a day off work, a day that is different.