Succession

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Related to Succession laws: right of succession

Succession

The rules of or process by which a person goes about filling a role previously held by another person. In estates, succession determines who owns the property of the decedent, with everything going to the next of kin in the absence of a will. In business, succession is the process by which one employee, especially a major executive like the CEO, is replaced by another person. In determining succession, a board of directors ought to exercise caution to ensure that an executive is not only competent, but also does not bring any conflicts of interest to the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
In defense of Peter's succession law, Feofan Prokopovich invoked an original contract that gave the monarch the consent of the people to rule "for our own welfare" (k obshchei pol'ze nashei).
If the succession law had not been introduced in 1701, the country would now be ruled by King Carl, a 50-year-old pastor in the German town of Neuwied.
For an overview of the limited efforts toward harmonizing European succession laws, see Paul Terner, Perspectives of a European Law of Succession, 14 MAASTRICHT J.
Congress passed the first presidential succession law in 1792.
Property Passing, by will or by operation of state intestate succession law, from an individual to his or her heirs or other beneficiaries.
With the change to the 300-yearold succession laws, a first-born girl will become Queen, regardless of any male siblings she may have.
Amazing as it seems, the apartment is still rent controlled because of succession laws.
We will be the laughing stock of the Commonwealth nations if every Australian State tries to pass its own substantive succession laws - the last time I checked, we hadn't reverted to a collection of colonies.
After the royal couple's wedding last April, British Prime Minister David Cameron announced moves to change succession laws so that their first child - whether a boy or a girl - would inherit the crown.
was amusing to read a Prince from the German town of Neuwied, on the Rhine, would be King Carl I of England had the new succession laws been around in Queen Anne's time (Mirror, October 31).