Subsidiary

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Related to Subsidaries: Wholly owned subsidiaries

Subsidiary

A wholly or partially owned company that is part of a large corporation. A foreign subsidiary is a separately incorporated entity under the host country's law. A subsidiary's financial results are carried on the parent company's books.

Subsidiary

A company that is publicly-traded but has more than half its stock owned by another company, known as the parent company. As long as the parent company owns more than half the stock, it maintains control of the subsidiary, though its other stock is still traded. Some subsidiaries belong to the same industry as the parent company, while others do not, and are part of a diversification effort on the part of the parent company. See also: Wholly owned subsidiary.

subsidiary

A company controlled or owned by another company. For example, the trucking company Overnite Transportation is a wholly owned subsidiary of Union Pacific Corporation. If a subsidiary is wholly owned, all its stock is held by the parent company. Compare holding company, parent company.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, were companies that were evolving to the "new" MNE model more likely to involve local subsidaries in negotiating and managing alliances that involved their geographical areas, and more traditional MNEs likely to keep the negotiation
subsidaries; and German Business Scope--business leads plus selected new product announcements from West Germany's leading manufacturers.
Applicants to either company can also send an email to recruitment@go-ahead-lon don.com The Go-Ahead Group also runs transports service in other areas including Wiltshire and Dorset and the North East, and you can find out more about the company and all its subsidaries at www.go-ahead.com First is another big name in the bus world, with operations in a number of cities, including Glasgow, where it was named Public Transport Operator of the Year in Scotland's own National Transport Awards.
It said a Swedish company which had taken on outsourced services of one of its subsidaries was wrong to treat the work as tax exempt.