Suborn


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Suborn

To encourage perjury through bribery, coercion, or any other means. Like perjury itself, subornation is illegal in practically every jurisdiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
was charged Wednesday with two counts of conspiracy, intimidation of a witness and attempt to suborn perjury.
The question is not so much whether, legally, he is guilty of perjury, attempting to suborn witnesses, conceal evidence or abuse his position of power.
Michael Wheeler, 39, of 11 Algonquin Road, Worcester, sentenced to five concurrent terms of 18 months in the House of Correction after pleading guilty to identity fraud, larceny over $250 by a common scheme, amended from larceny over $250 from a person over 60 years old or disabled with an injury, two counts of larceny over $250 from a person over 60 years old or disabled with an injury, and attempting to suborn perjury.
Beyond the nature of Clinton's relationship with Lewinsky, Starr has been investigating whether Clinton tried to obstruct justice and suborn perjury.
But not apparently by the United States, which claims the right to suborn elections in a country that it has spent ten years reducing to beggary and privation.
Since people don't think the president's affairs are abnormal, do they think it's OK to suborn perjury to cover up the affairs?
All captains he sought to suborn refused his overtures, so he had the great rocks flown back at staggering expense.
Whatever you think of, it's probably not a herd of zebu, or yak-crosses, or bison-crosses or suborns.
Leakage through informal cooperation is often quite explainable: one party who stands to benefit (by whatever means) suborns another to violate the law or policy to provide high-value information.
As his mansion burns to ashes the author of this particular attention-seeking Is out pruning his tomatoes oblivious to the conflagration all around him, or If he Is sensitive to events beyond his living-room he doesn't give a fig for the consequences to other people In the good old "I'm all right Jack spirit" which defaces and suborns British politics, a la Fred Goodwin.