Subprime lending

(redirected from Sub-prime mortgage)

Subprime lending

Lending to individuals who have a bad credit history or relatively low income. A higher interest rate is charged for such loans because risk to the lender is higher. Excessive subprime lending is often pointed to as one of the major causes of the financial crisis of 2008-2009.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bank observed that the global leveraged loan market is larger than the US sub-prime mortgage market in 2006.
"The Minister for Finance Michael Noonan has confirmed that 56% of the home sub-prime mortgage book is in arrears of 90 days or more," he said.
The SEC had accused Tourre of misleading investors in a sub-prime mortgage investment deal in 2007 that cost investors $1bn ([pounds sterling]623bn, E743bn).
In a damning report, Shale and Wall Street: Was The Decline In Natural Gas Prices Orchestrated, she argues that the rush to invest in the controversial energy source is showing signs of crashing just like the sub-prime mortgage market helped wreck the world economy in 2007.
The term was apparently coined by finance professor and former Wall Street trader Nassim Nicholas Taleb, who used it to describe the sub-prime mortgage crisis of 2008.
Not satisfied with that, when the crash did arrive, it turned out that the banks' casino side had been mopping up sub-prime mortgage bonds from the US banks without apparently understanding what they were.
The Royal Bank of Scotland slumped more than 11% after the US Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) filed claims against three UK banks as part of actions relating to the sub-prime mortgage scandal.
Paulson's gains were made principally by shorting sub-prime mortgage instruments.
The SEC alleges Goldman, which employs 5,500 people in the UK, failed to disclose that one of its clients helped create - and then bet against - sub-prime mortgage securities that Goldman sold to investors.
Stocks worldwide plummeted after the SEC announced it was filing a civil fraud charge against Goldman over allegations that it defrauded investors in its disclosures about securities it sold which were tied to sub-prime mortgage securities.
LexisNexis Mealey (New York) has begun the publication of "LexisNexis Financial Services Litigation Report," a new monthly newsletter that covers the sub-prime mortgage crisis and the "next great mega-litigation." An annual to the new title subscription costs $895.
Now in a fully updated and expanded fourth edition, TRUSTED CRIMINALS: WHITE COLLAR CRIME IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY provides the latest noteworthy cases and developments in fraud in all kinds of industries, from sub-prime mortgage loans and illegal activity in pharmaceutical circles to insurance scams.