Structural Adjustment

(redirected from Structural Adjustment Policies)

Structural Adjustment

A government program in a developing country making changes to economic or monetary policies in order to better facilitate growth. For example, a structural adjustment loan may include a stipulation that the borrowing country relax any protectionist subsidies or impose higher taxes to balance the budget. Structural adjustments are necessary in some cases before the IMF or the World Bank will make loans to finance further development. See also: Structural Adjustment Facility.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1991, Egypt was granted a $562m loan from the IMF, the World Bank, the African Development Bank, and other international financial institutions on the condition that Egypt would accept stabilisation and structural adjustment policies along with the loans.
Furthermore, the sample and the time interval considered allow us to estimate the effects without considering particular situations and to reflect on the general implications of structural adjustment policies.
There are two aspects of the subsequent structural adjustment policies that are important to emphasize.
Using the Household monthly income data, he shows that real income decreased from 1987-88 to 1990-91 and concludes that structural adjustment policies are detrimental for the socio-economic well being of the poor.
The left was on the defensive due to the collapse of socialism in the Soviet Bloc, and in many countries it was the historically labour-based populist parties who took the lead in imposing structural adjustment policies.
They bring approaches from development economics and feminist theory into this relatively new field as they examine the results of structural adjustment policies such as macroeconomic aggregates.
There's no question that the structural adjustment policies of the 1980s and early 1990s received a lot of criticism.
For example the 2006 report on development effectiveness showed that structural adjustment policies, including trade liberalization, have often worsened inequality and hindered distribution.
More precisely, it was assumed, particularly in the structural adjustment policies of the 1980s, that the agricultural sector would not need the state, which proved to be a mistake.
Bacon also explores the history of explicitly racist laws like the Chinese Exclusion Art and structural adjustment policies that forced Latin American and Caribbean countries to cut wages and services.
The structural adjustment policies, lending for privatisation exercises, free capital movement and the industrialisation of agriculture, has perpetuated structural inequality under the guise of the Green Revolution.
Structural adjustment policies (SAPs) have been implemented throughout most of the Third World.

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