Structural Adjustment

(redirected from Structural Adjustment Policies)

Structural Adjustment

A government program in a developing country making changes to economic or monetary policies in order to better facilitate growth. For example, a structural adjustment loan may include a stipulation that the borrowing country relax any protectionist subsidies or impose higher taxes to balance the budget. Structural adjustments are necessary in some cases before the IMF or the World Bank will make loans to finance further development. See also: Structural Adjustment Facility.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When I look back at the damage that these Bretton Woods policies did to the capacity of our economy to generate decent permanent jobs to its people, I feel that the biggest mistake we made was to ignore the social impact of structural adjustment policies on society.
Critically, because the external trade challenge affects the coastal areas more than the inland areas, structural adjustment policies need to be tailored to accommodate different local conditions.
A careful examination of the principal components of the new approach suggests that it builds on conventional stabilization and structural adjustment policies by adding two new elements (UNCTAD, 2002).
In 1991, Egypt was granted a $562m loan from the IMF, the World Bank, the African Development Bank, and other international financial institutions on the condition that Egypt would accept stabilisation and structural adjustment policies along with the loans.
Furthermore, the sample and the time interval considered allow us to estimate the effects without considering particular situations and to reflect on the general implications of structural adjustment policies. Both techniques generate results consistent with a positive value of discretionary fiscal policy multipliers.
There are two aspects of the subsequent structural adjustment policies that are important to emphasize.
Using the Household monthly income data, he shows that real income decreased from 1987-88 to 1990-91 and concludes that structural adjustment policies are detrimental for the socio-economic well being of the poor.
You saw that in the structural adjustment policies, as they were called in Africa.
The left was on the defensive due to the collapse of socialism in the Soviet Bloc, and in many countries it was the historically labour-based populist parties who took the lead in imposing structural adjustment policies.
They bring approaches from development economics and feminist theory into this relatively new field as they examine the results of structural adjustment policies such as macroeconomic aggregates.
There's no question that the structural adjustment policies of the 1980s and early 1990s received a lot of criticism.

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