Strike Benefits

Strike Benefits

Health insurance and other employee benefits provided by a union to members while they are on strike. In a strike, union members do not come to work as a form of protest. However, this deprives them of the wages and benefits they otherwise would have received, which increases the likelihood that people will go back to work prematurely and the strike will fail. Strike benefits help reduce this risk. See also: Strike pay.
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But members will be faced with the dilemma that the ATU will not give its blessing - and strike benefits - to any decision by the local to strike until after an international vice president has met with the company, and the company will not meet with International Vice President Lawrence J.
Since April 14, P-9's parent union has been trying to take over the local, having previously revoked strike benefits. The T.W.A.
If we didn't, we would lose all strike benefits, and our local would be put in trusteeship (by which the local is denied self-governance and all its political and financial affairs are placed in the hands of a "trustee," handpicked by the International).
They alone received no strike benefits and had to beg from an emergency fund set up by the A.F.L.-C.I.O.
One possible reason was that the striking pilots are receiving strike benefits of $2,400 a month from their union, compared with $70 a week for the mechanics and nothing for the flight attendants.
In the collective bargaining area, amendments considered but not adopted included those to postpone conventions in years of major contract negotiations, to hold conventions in cities most affected by layoffs of members, to increase the amount of stike benefits, and to provide for strike benefits payment as a matter of right rather than after determination of need by the local union.
Being nonprofit, it was not obligated to pay corporate income taxes and it claimed that the wages it paid should be defined as strike benefits and therefore should be exempt from other taxes.
Hoffa, meanwhile, supported the idea of a Michigan/Ohio strike fund (of which he is one of the controllers) at a $1 a month dues levy, which would supposedly pay each worker $150 a week in strike benefits. Then the newspaper workers went on strike, and even though the Hoffa gang reduced the benefits from day one, the fund still went broke after eight weeks.
The Typographical Union had strike benefits paying up to $250 a week, one of the highest strike benefits of any union financed with a strike fund assessment of 0.5 percent of income per member.
Union strike benefits and certain disability pensions are includable in earned income, although not taxable.
In the end, the strike was broken by workers brought in by rail from other furniture-making centers, the poverty induced by the length of the strike, the 2,000 striking workers not allowed to join the exclusive craft unions and receive strike benefits, and the official condemnation of the Christian Reformed Church, the Protestant religion of the Dutch strikers.