Street

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Street

Means Wall Street financial community; brokers, dealers, underwriters, and other knowledgeable participants.

Wall Street

A street in New York City that forms the center of its financial district. The NYSE, NASDAQ, and American Stock Exchange, among others, are headquartered on Wall Street. Additionally, several investment companies maintain their primary offices on or near Wall Street. Because of its influence on the wider financial world, Wall Street is often used as a byword for the financial industry in the United States and its lobbyists. In this sense, Wall Street is important to political discourse in the United States. The sheer amount of money traded on Wall Street render it vitally important to the global economy as well.
References in classic literature ?
At last, satisfactorily disguised, and with even his shock of black hair adding to the verisimilitude of his likeness to the natives of the city, he sought for some means of reaching the street below.
At this place a large detachment of soldiery were posted, who fired, now up Fleet Market, now up Holborn, now up Snow Hill--constantly raking the streets in each direction.
As my brother began to realise the import of all these things, he turned hastily to his own room, put all his available money--some ten pounds altogether--into his pockets, and went out again into the streets.
They marched across the street, forcing their way roughly through the crowd, and pricking the townspeople with their bayonets.
Meanwhile, the venerable stranger, staff in hand, was pursuing his solitary walk along the centre of the street.
It was not a column, but a mob, an awful river that filled the street, the people of the abyss, mad with drink and wrong, up at last and roaring for the blood of their masters.
A hotel would require pay in advance --I must walk the street all night, and perhaps be arrested as a suspicious character.
There came a voice to a citizen of Damascus, named Ananias, saying, "Arise, and go into the street which is called Straight, and inquire at the house of Judas, for one called Saul, of Tarsus; for behold, he prayeth.
At that descent all the cars in the streets stopped with dramatic suddenness, and all the lights that had been coming on in the streets and houses went out again.
When driving about, he felt that he was held liable by the police for anything that might occur in the streets, and was the common prey of all energetic officials.
Through the streets soldiers in various uniforms walked or ran confusedly in different directions like ants from a ruined ant-hill.
The roar came closer, and Saxon, leaning out, saw a dozen scabs, conveyed by as many special police and Pinkertons, coming down the sidewalk on her side of tho street.