straw man

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Related to Straw man argument: fallacy, Slippery slope fallacy

straw man

One who purchases real property in his or her own name and then holds it for sale to the person who supplied the money for the sale,the intended ultimate purchaser.The technique is often used when a well-known developer,or even a large local property owner such as a hospital or university,wishes to conceal its identity so sellers do not raise their prices.

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In the classroom, my students and I look into the possible arguments that might support readings that seem to fall on the borderline of interpretive validity--we "check" them out to see if they are truly "wrong." The example I offer traces an interesting case involving an example of pedagogical determinism, a critical call for a move away from this stance, and then a surprising retreat back to a straw man argument designed to reintroduce determinism and avoid interpretive anarchy.
She also relies heavily on setting up and knocking down straw man arguments, making false claims about what "gun owners" believe, and then debunking those supposed beliefs with statistics from her preferred, anti-gun researchers.
Tasmanians should also be prepared for embattled leader Bryan Green to say and do anything for his own political self-interest, with more false claims - like the non-existent RHH "illness cluster and Basslink being "fried''; straw man arguments such as how not selling the Tamar Valley Power Station somehow caused a drought and Basslink to break, as well as outrageous personal slurs.
As Case observes, politicians can be masters at engaging in straw man arguments, which, she writes, "in addition to being logically invalid, function to keep people from paying attention to the evidence." Her goal is to help readers make sense of canine research and apply its findings to real life.
Since the anonymous "you" is, by definition, a fiction ("a statistic" Harris might claim, or perhaps "a pastiche"), all Harris's arguments are straw man arguments. And he keeps calling the straw man "you" which has got to qualify as one of the most grating conceits a book has ever been built around.