tax rate

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Tax rate

The percentage of tax paid for different levels of income.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Tax Rate

A percentage of one's income that one must pay in taxes. Tax rates vary according to incomes. That is, one who makes $100,000 per year usually has a higher tax rate than one who makes $25,000. See also: Marginal tax rate, Average tax rate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

tax rate

The proportional amount of taxes paid on a given income or the given dollar value of an asset. If the tax is calculated on the basis of total income, it is the average tax rate. If the tax is calculated only on extra units of income, the rate is the marginal tax rate.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

tax rate

the percentage rate at which a TAX is levied on income or expenditure. Tax rates are varied by government on social grounds (to redistribute income) and, as part of FISCAL POLICY, to increase or decrease spending.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

tax rate

The percentage used to calculate various taxes.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
We also find that properties with high statutory tax rates have higher delinquency rates.
The reductions in the average tax rates are likely due to both to reductions in the statutory tax rates and changes in the tax base.
Table 2 shows the effects of changes in underlying tax net income (i.e., taxable income before NOL and special deductions) on our sample of firms' statutory tax rates from 2004 to 2008.
However, even after the reform German statutory tax rates will remain significantly above those of several smaller countries, such as Hungary and the Slovak Republic, which are among the main beneficiaries of European profit-shifting (Huizinga and Laeven, 2005).
Personal and corporate tax rates Top statutory tax rate on: Personal Corporate income income 2004 2004 2005 Austria 50 34 25 Belgium 50 34 34 Cyprus 30 15 10 Czech Republic 32 28 26 Denmark 47.6 30 28 Estonia 26 26 24 Finland 53 29 26 France 49.6 35.4 35.4 Germany 45 38.3 38.3 Greece 40 35 32 Hungary 40 17.7 16 Ireland 42 12.5 12.5 Italy 45 37.3 37.3 Latvia 33 15 15 Lithuania 25 15 15 Luxembourg 38 30.4 30.4 Malta 35 35 35 Netherlands 52 34.5 31.5 Poland 40 19 19 Portugal 40 27.5 27.5 Slovak Republic 38 19 19 Slovenia 50 25 25 Spain 45 35 35 Sweden 56 28 28 United Kingdom 40 30 30 EU average (1) 41.7 27.4 26.0 Average of EU-15 (1) 46.2 31.4 29.8 Average of 10 new EU member states (1) 34.9 21.5 20.4 (1.) Arithmetic average.
The mean volatility for KETR is considerably higher across countries than is the mean volatility estimated for METR, AETR, and the statutory tax rate. Average KETR volatility ranges from a low of 7.2 for the United States to a high of 1,413.1 for Japan.
The United States has tax treaties with many countries, which generally will reduce the statutory tax rate for income paid to U.S.
The Joint Committee staff estimated that in 1998 the effective marginal tax rate differed from the statutory tax rate for 33.2 million tax returns (Barthold et al.
This study focuses on six tax-law changes included in the Tax Reform Act of 1986: two changes in tax rates (a decrease in the statutory tax rate and an increase in the capital gains tax rate); one change in tax rate and the calculation of taxable income (implementation of an alternative minimum tax); and three changes to tax credits (elimination of the investment tax credit; computation of the available research and development [R&D] tax credit; extensive changes to the foreign tax credit).
Early capital structure literature assumed all firms faced the top corporate statutory tax rate when considering the debt interest tax shield (Miller 1977).
The Company noted that the effective tax rate in the 1998 third quarter, in part reflected the increase in the French statutory tax rate and the Deneb goodwill amortization which is not tax deductible.
Tax codes stipulate not only a statutory tax rate, but also a set of rules for calculating taxable income.