Statute of Uses


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Statute of Uses

A statute passed in England during the reign of King Henry VIII and expressly or by implication adopted by all American states. Formerly, one could not create an estate in land that would begin in the future.After the statute,such estates were granted legal recognition.One often sees frequent references to the Statute of Uses although it is seldom a point of contention between parties. However, as recently as 2003 the issue was raised in a California case in the context of determining rights of various parties in a trust.

References in periodicals archive ?
Coke's report on Chudleigh's Case was not published until 1600, but we know that in 1592 Coke gave an extended series of lectures on the Statute of Uses at the Inner Temple.
The means in "meanes blesse" can thus refer not only to mere wealth, but also to the legal devices that the Statute of Uses and Coke in his ruling on Chudleigh's Case had tried to extirpate.
Given our sometimes romanticized views about Donne as a freethinking skeptic and intellectual flaneur, it may be difficult to accept that he could have taken an interest in the Statute of Uses, in the 1593 Parliament, and in Chudleigh's Case.
The Political Causes which Shaped the Statute of Uses.
12) Bacon, 1861b, 495, explains that the Statute of Uses was passed because Parliament foresaw "that it would be mischievous that men's lands should so suddenly, upon the payment of a little money, be conveyed from them, peradventure in an alehouse or a tavern upon strainable advantages.