Statism

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Statism

1. In political science, the theory that the state exercises (or should exercise) control over a society and for that reason is a major engine of social change.

2. See: State capitalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to statists, individuals' lives and goals don't matter.
Part II develops a partial critique and a partial defense of both statist and cosmopolitan theories, whereas in part III Ypi presents her version of statist cosmopoltanism and avant-garde political theory.
And Burkean conservatives in Eastern Europe must compete not only with the nationalist far right but also with other rightwing groupings that are statist but not explicitly ethnocentric, such as Hungary's Fidesz party.
The new "hope and change" statists are just warmed-over ancient utopians, Levin states.
Under present day circumstances, statists and confessionals may establish a joint log roll, but agreements with liberalizers are more difficult to form.
The statists see themselves as the only true patriots who can save Russia from the collapse, corruption and weakness they see as Yeltsin's legacy.
On the conservative ascendance (though he cannot resist occasional sarcasm), he fully acknowledges the New Right's skill in laying claim to the rhetoric of liberty and portraying liberals and leftists as anti-freedom statists and egalitarians.
Ericson does not think that Meiji government had a negative attitude toward private enterprise as the statists did.
Statists do not speak of government as a collection of bureaucrats, agencies, and limited constitutional powers, but as the embodiment of the collective good--as community itself.
Especially important is the charge leveled by statists and others that societal approaches systematically underestimate the effects of two factors that regulate the provision of protection: state interests with respect to trade policy and domestic institutions.
Finally, as the culmination of his analysis, the author examines in detail the abortive coup of 19-21 August 1991 as a consequence of which Yeltsin and his democrats emerged victorious not only over the conservative statists who had attempted to seize power but also over Gorbachev, communism, and the Soviet Union.