statistics

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statistics

  1. methods of collecting and analysing numerical data.
  2. a group of data.

    Businesspeople make considerable use of statistical methods such as collecting SAMPLES in order to make STATISTICAL INFERENCES in such areas as MARKETING RESEARCH and QUALITY CONTROL. They also use government economic data in monitoring changes in the business environment.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

statistics

  1. a branch of mathematics that studies the theory and methods of collecting, tabulating and analysing numerical data.
  2. a grouping of data. Economic analysis makes extensive use of economic data, which are subjected to statistical analysis in order to test ECONOMIC THEORIES. See HYPOTHESIS TESTING, ECONOMETRICS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
and Mangat, N., Some development in randomized response sampling during the last decade-a follow up of review by Chaudhuri and Mukerjee, Journal of Applied Statistical Sciences, 4 533-544, (1996).
Koenker, "The Gaussian hare and the Laplacian tortoise: computability of squared-error versus absolute-error estimators," Statistical Science, vol.
The ASA press release goes on to say that a Fellow's award is "not only a recognition of outstanding professional contribution to and leadership in the field of statistical science, but also a superlative honor in the society for nearly 90 years."
"More and more in statistical science, researchers are handling huge amounts of data in the Monte Carlo random number generation method," said Professor Kitagawa.
But critics charge that many states are using unsupportable statistical science to boost passing rates.
Utts published first in Statistical Science in 1991 and then sent her report to Congress in 1995.
By contrast, the sampling error probability is a characteristic of statistical science. Appreciating the distinctions among these probabilities facilitates an understanding of the relationship between the preponderance of the evidence standard and the probabilities reported by statisticians.
"Can We Reach Consensus on Census Adjustment?" Statistical Science 9(4): 486-508.
That year, researchers announced in the journal Statistical Science that a computer search of Genesis revealed many famous rabbinical names "hidden" in the text, along with the dates of each rabbi's birth or death.
These "other aspects" are what constitute the data that is treated by statistical science. While much of what goes on in the world can be explained according to classical laws, not everything can be explained according to systematic process.(15) In addition to the regularity and invariance of the law of gravity or one's digestive system, there are other factors in the world that cannot be explained by a single insight into a multitude of data.
"Statistical science has powerful and far-reaching effects on everyone, yet most people are unaware of how it improves their lives," says ASA Executive Director Ronald L.

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