Stale price

Stale price

An old price of the asset that does not reflect the most recent information.

Stale Price

The current price of an asset that does not reflect recently revealed or other available information. The stale price is unlikely to remain stale as the market absorbs the information and reflects it in the price. Analysts disagree on how long this takes, as different versions of the efficient markets hypothesis state that the stale price either evaporates quickly, or does not exist at all.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the aim is to produce a price series that is regularly spaced in clock time (say every 15 minutes), there may not be trades or quotes at these precise times, and the most recent price is usually used as a proxy for the current price, resulting in at least some stale price is usually used as a proxy for the current price, resulting in at least some stale price observations.
However, while the absolute size of the stale price effect is fixed, its relative impertance increases as the differencing interval is reduced.
They include self-selection bias, instant history or backfilling bias, survivorship bias, stale price bias, and multi-period sampling bias.
A better term would be "stale price arbitrage." That is because the clever or corrupt trader is taking advantage of the fact that transactions will not be conducted at fair market value, but at prices that are outdated.
To be certain that the existence of these premiums over the call price is not because of stale price quotations, Table 4 also reports separate summary statistics for bid prices and sale prices.
The goal of this new feature is to enable liquidity providers to take more risk and quote tighter spreads with greater size by giving them sufficient time to re-price their resting orders before opportunistic traders can trade with them at stale prices. LP2 would be the first-ever delay mechanism in the U.S.
This is most helpful for ETFs that invest in domestic securities, however, because the INAV may reflect stale prices of foreign securities in markets that are closed.
That means that the fund's current net asset value relies on stale prices for 24 stocks out of a total of 28.
Unlike hedge funds, which as unregulated or loosely regulated entities selling mainly to sophisticated investors can afford to value a portfolio infrequently and even make use of stale prices, mutual funds are regulated entities obliged to produce a daily NAV using the most accurate, clean and up-to-date prices available.
Other investors were allowed to conduct market timing trades to take advantage of stale prices used by funds to calculate their net asset values at funds with stated policies against such trading.
Mutual fund prices become outdated, or "stale." Someone who can buy or sell to exploit the gap between stale prices and real prices - a "market timer" - can make a killing.
As a result any nontrading bias in the basis due to stale prices should be small.