Impairment

(redirected from Specific language impairment)
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Impairment

Reduction in the value of an asset because the asset no longer generates the benefits expected earlier as determined by the company through periodic assessments. This could happen because of changes in market value of the asset, business environment, government regulations, etc.

Impairment

A reduction in a company's working capital as a result of a loss on an investment or a distribution (such as a coupon or dividend) to investors.

impairment

Reduction in a firm's capital as a result of distributions or losses.
References in periodicals archive ?
A longitudinal study of behavioral, emotional and social difficulties in individuals with a history of specific language impairment (SLI).
Rosenzweig, "Social cognition and language in children with specific language impairment (SLI)," Journal of Communication Disorders, vol.
Phonological working memory in Spanish-English bilingual children with and without specific language impairment.
Relation of working memory to off-line and real-time sentence processing in children with specific language impairment.
A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of verbal working memory in adolescents with specific language impairment.
Pauses in narratives of English-speaking children with specific language impairment.
Efficacy of Speech Therapy in Children with Language Disorders: Specific Language Impairment compared with Language Impairment in Comorbidity with Cognitive Delay.
Botting (2002) compares narrative skills in 7-8 year-old children with a severe pragmatic impairment (PLI) and children with a specific language impairment (SLI).
Children with reduced brain volume, rightward asymmetry of the planum and small first Heschl's gyri were at high risk for specific language impairment, particularly if they had low levels of the phonological risk factors defined in the dyslexia study described in the preceding paragraph.
Likewise, Cohen and Riccio (cited in Riccio & Jemison, 1998) provide evidence that the ADD characteristic of specific language impairment may be the strongest cause of reading problems in individuals with ADD.

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