Filter

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Filter

A rule that stipulates when a security should be bought or sold according to its price action.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Filter Rule

In technical analysis, an arbitrarily set percentage of increase or decline in a stock's price that the analyst sees as an indicator to buy or sell the stock. For example, the analyst may set his/her own filter rule at 15%. If the stock rises 15%, the analyst recommends buying; if it falls 15%, he/she recommends selling. While the particular percentage is subjective, one arrives at it by observing the stock's historical trends. The filter rule exists to help the investor avoid buying or selling at insignificant or anomalous changes in price. However, many analysts do not believe that the filter rule consistently produces profits for the investor.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
It's no wonder that the spam filter has repeatedly been accused (unfairly!) of having nefarious motives: of silencing the critics of Roman Polanski, for instance, or censoring the tech blogger Robert Scoble.
[30] Spam Filter Review, 2007, http://spam-filter-review.toptenreviews.com/.
In most of spam filters which act based on machine learning, [theta] is the result of the training of classifier on pre-collected data set.
THE E-MAIL MARKETING COMMUNITY is still quaking over recently announced plans by America Online and Yahoo to begin charging internet postage for optional "preferred e-mail" service, which would enable company e-mails to breeze past the spam filters of the two e-mail service providers.
Because his last name, which is part of his email address, is so close to "spammer," his outgoing e-mail is regularly flagged by spam filters.
I'm beginning to get frustrated with spam filters. Responses like the one above are becoming more common, and a real impediment to communicating with the thousands of companies that Communications News deals with daily.
Between the hackers who have co-opted Outlook as their own private petri dish for viruses to the guerrilla marketers who manage to stay one step ahead of the spam filters, e-mail has gone way past convenient to where it's threatening the stability of networks.
It is difficult to reflect users' preferences in a spam filter at the SMS center, the main node on the network.
Chris Williams of uSwitch.com, which did the survey, said: "People should get a spam filter."
A researcher on the reproductive activities of fruit flies could find e-mail blocked because the spam filter cannot differentiate it from the flood of sex-related information figuring in message scans.
The spam filter solution is created for end-users and plugs into Outlook, Outlook Express or any other POP3 mail client to scan incoming mails and block spam.
The idea is that the snippet of plain English will fool the spam filter into thinking the message is legitimate, and sometimes it works.