Sovereign

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Sovereign

1. A gold coin in the United Kingdom. It has a face value of one British pound, but because it is made of gold, its actual value far exceeds one pound. Investors use sovereigns as bullion coins.

2. See: Sovereignty.
References in classic literature ?
"I have no sovereign. I myself am sovereign in my own country."
``Must I so soon risk the pardon and favour of my Sovereign?'' said Robin Hood, pausing for all instant; ``but by Saint Christopher, it shall be so.
In the meantime, Robin Hood had sent off several of his followers in different directions, as if to reconnoitre the enemy; and when he saw the company effectually broken up, he approached Richard, who was now completely armed, and, kneeling down on one knee, craved pardon of his Sovereign.
The new aircraft have replaced 2 standard Citation Sovereigns that the French company has operated since 2008.
Desperate homeowners are vulnerable and may be willing to believe anything that allows them to keep their homes--even the circular logic of the sovereigns.
The unique competitive dynamics of China are appealing for sovereigns seeking more diversification, the survey found, with equities continuing to be the asset class most favoured.
Summary: The Gulf Cooperation Council countries are among the 22 sovereigns with liquid assets exceeding 25% of GDP, and three of them have liquid assets worth more than 100% of GDP, S&P Global Ratings said in its report titled Ee"Government Liquid Assets And Sovereign Ratings: Size MattersEe".
Under the SBBS proposal, sovereigns would continue to issue bonds for which they would have sole liability.
Moody's estimates that total Sukuk issuance will reach around $95 billion by the end of this year, after more than $85 billion in 2016, including more than $50 billion of Sukuk issuance by sovereigns.
The sovereigns minted today are struck to the same purity they have had since 1817 - solid 22 carat gold.
Further, sovereigns would be less inclined to make laws against other sovereigns, because it would be foolish for a sovereign to make laws that would not be respected.
"Sovereigns say that the government then uses that birth certificate to set up a kind of corporate trust in the baby's name - a secret Treasury account - which it funds with an amount ranging from $600,000 to $20 million."