Sovereignty

(redirected from Sovereign power)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Sovereign power: Sovereign right

Sovereignty

The legal right of a state to govern its own affairs in its own territory without outside interference. Sovereignty may reside with an individual (such as a monarch, sometimes known as a sovereign), a body (such as a parliament) or with the populace as a whole. The notion of sovereignty is less clear in federal governments like the U.S. and Canada, as sovereignty is split between the national government and the regional governments. This is a matter of considerable controversy in some countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite this focus on the workings of sovereign power in Nazi Germany, Agamben does not confine the state of exception to totalitarian regimes.
And relying on a political account risks relegating some human rights to the sidelines, such as the right to development, because they do not act as reasons that justify the exercise of sovereign power, even though they serve as reasons to mitigate the distribution of sovereign power that international law performs to structure global politics into an international legal order.
In the eighteenth century, sovereign power is there, all over the place, its existence incompatible with the familiar notions of a liberal, public sphere.
The purposeful availment requirement, for example, is tied to the subjective intentions of the defendant rather than the sovereign power of the states.
These concerns are perhaps especially relevant in a twenty-first century that has witnessed the rise of resurgent authoritarian regimes such as in Russia and China, as well as similar policy initiatives like the war on terror that apparently exemplify direct sovereign power at its most potent.
It was in this context that sovereign power returned to a valley whose inhabitants were already schooled in keeping subterranean secrets.
Rather, Massachusetts residents should have the right to exercise their sovereign power on a question of economic and social importance.
Central to the argument is the considerations of iuirisprudentia and modern natural law as founded by Hugo Grotius and Samuel van Pufendorf in relation to such themes as religious pluralism in the State; the definition of the obligations and limits of legislation, and the rights of sovereign power in religion; the rejection of the confessional State and the use of force against revolutionary movements of the human conscience; the justification of the right to resist; and the elaboration of the characteristics and limits of the new notion of civil tolerance (derived from the voluntaristic and anti-Hobbesian perspective of Barbeyrac in his commentary on Pufendorf using Locke's work and the theory of obligation).
The postwar history of Okinawa may be said to be a history of resistance by people who have sought to regain their lost sovereign power.
On this issue, "[t]here is a general agreement in the postulation of an original contract as the foundation of the sovereign power.
However, BSP lawmaker Petar Dimitrov has pointed out that the people, who are the sovereign power, "have already voiced their opinion on the issue.
HSBC is involved in illegally transferring monies for the sale of these properties knowing that title to the underlying properties are illegal and/or defective because the "TRNC" lacks the sovereign power to issue or obtain title.