International Law

(redirected from Sources of international law)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

International Law

The area of law dealing with relations between countries. International law consists of many aspects, both written and unwritten, but often refers to matters of war and peace, respect for human rights, international trade and commerce, and similar things. Institutions like the United Nations and the International Criminal Court purport to enforce international law, though their effectiveness is limited by the cooperation given by member states. In general, international law is governed by treaties between sovereign states.
References in periodicals archive ?
absence of inherent hierarchies among sources of international law means
H VAN HOOF, RETHINKING THE SOURCES OF INTERNATIONAL LAW 131-5l (1983); Hermann Mosler, General Principles of Law, in ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW 89, 90-92 (7th ed.
Such a broad power, according to this prevailing opinion, would inject subjectivity into the sources of international law and would be mistrusted by governments.
The court started its analysis with the examination of various sources of international law.
Australia) has undertaken preparation of a solidly organized, clearly developed presentation of the history, theory, purpose, and sources of international law, and how it functions.
court surveyed various sources of international law to determine whether the plaintiffs' ATS claims alleged violations of customary norms.
The sources of international law recognized in Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice (ICJ Statute) do not reveal a rule that corporations are liable for violations of the law of nations.
Indeed, CIL's ostensible efficiency appears to have been a primary motivation for its incorporation into the ICJ's Statute Article 38's formulation of the sources of international law.
The politics underlying the different approaches to the sources of international law have also been well explained by Koskenniemi (11).
These sources of international law -- the General Assembly resolution condemning the crime of genocide, examples of national legislation criminalizing genocide, and the sentiments of the public conscience -- reflect an understanding that no legally justifiable principle exists to distinguish political groups from the other groups in the Genocide Convention.
In discussing the sources of international law, Professor Higgins seems to have changed her evaluation of the role of resolutions enacted by international organizations in crystallizing international norms.