Social Contract Theory


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Social Contract Theory

The theory that morality is a manifestation of the mutual consent of all persons involved in a society. For example, murder is wrong according to social contract theory because society has generally agreed that it would not be conducive to prosperous relations, and not because it is wrong in and of itself. Social contract theory is used in government as one of the foundations of the modern state. "Government by consent of the governed," one of the most fundamental ideas of democracy, has its origins in social contract theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last, but not least, the social contract theory's moral provision of equality--all contractual parties are to be equal--can be potentially problematic because in theory as well as in reality, there are visible or invisible groups of people who would not fit into the contract theory's equality clause.
The above figure 1.1 shows how an Islamic bank can exist in a society using social contract theory. Corporate will behave responsibly and in return community will allow corporate to conduct business.
Literary scholars, especially those who study or teach apocalyptic and postapocalyptic fiction, as well as political scientists interested in social contract theory and society's responses to monumental challenges to the status quo, should find this volume useful and engaging.
In particular, as I have suggested, I will re-read Mendelssohn's social contract theory as an exceptional case, offering new resources for contemporary political and cultural theory.
Officers need to be familiar with social contract theory because it gives legitimacy to the American system of government and the role of police in society.
It is, I think, significant that Nussbaum's cosmopolitan skepticism, which dates back at least to her 1994 essay, has now led her to question social contract theory. Her outcome-oriented approach grows from the problem that social contract theory does not do an adequate job of accounting for justice to persons outside the state.
From figure 4, one would expect that it is only necessary to check against the social contract theory as it is the most restrictive one.
It was during the mid-17th to the late-18th century, however, that social contract theory became prominent.
Those who would seek to justify such sweeping change may find theoretical solace in the social contract theories of Locke and Rousseau while their opponents could, somewhat paradoxically, also turn to social contract theory, in particular, that of Thomas Hobbes.
It is worthwhile noting though that Hobbes' social contract theory r ested on the presumption that 'warre' was a manifestation of social breakdown.
Rawls' indebtedness to Rousseau's social contract theory and Mill's utilitarianism is acknowledged and is apparent throughout.