Slump


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Slump

A temporary fall in performance, often describing consistently falling security prices for several weeks or months.

Slump

Informal for a downturn in an industry or economy. It specifically refers to a recession, which is defined as negative GDP growth for two consecutive quarters. However, there is no set definition for what constitutes a slump.

Slump.

In an investment slump, prices fall. The slump may affect an individual investment as the result of company-specific problems or it may affect an entire investment market. Often a slump is short-term, but it may also signal a long-term decline.

slump

see BUSINESS CYCLE.

slump

see DEPRESSION.
References in periodicals archive ?
A producer in a slump can turn to his network of clients, associates, prospects in his database, family, friends and acquaintances to help jump-start his sales.
Based on the available slump data, after comprehensive regression analysis and significance testing, the best-fit coefficients of [[alpha].sub.1] were found and are given in Table 1.
"A slump is a life-crippling, life-crushing experience," said Pete Siegel, a Southern California hypnotherapist who has worked with numerous major leaguers, including Damion Easley, Tim Salmon and Scott Spiezio.
An employee memo from Simon & Schuster chief executive Jack Romanos, quoted by Reuters, said that the weak retail environment had contributed to the industry slump and that the timeframe for an economic turnaround was uncertain.
Sales of used trucks were also slack due to the economic slump, falling 10.4% to 41,790 units, down for the third straight month, the association said.
scrap may have picked up, possibly because East Asian steel mills are also melting at a higher rate than they were during the prolonged slump.
The New York Stock Exchange slumped 3.14%, NASDAQ dropped 3.20% and AMEX fell 9.1%.
According to a new report by Frost & Sullivan studying the adhesives market in the different national and regional markets of Western Europe in seven categories, the basic cause of this slump is the world recession, characterized by price-cutting, thin profit margins, restructuring and rationalization within the companies.
But these factors turned negative in the 1980s and pushed agricultural profitability and land values into a slump. From 1980 to 1987, Ninth District land prices declined 35 percent to 60 percent, and foreclosures increased markedly.
Many think that the tremendous slump in economic integration that began in 1913, and which wasn't overcome until about 1975, demonstrates that technology overrides politics.
To the extent that rising oil prices lower consumer purchasing power and add another increment to business costs, they will assure a continued slump in demand.
Another points to slowed growth in primary markets: "The marine industry, for one, continues to be in a slump." He adds that this market has been hard hit by environmental regulations--particularly those concerning styrene monomer emissions.