Slavery

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Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Secondly, the slaveowner had to acquiesce to the enslaved person's request to be freed.
In the slavery chapter in American Notes, Dickens deplores various practices of slaveowners: violently punching out their teeth, making them wear iron collars day and night, and worrying them with dogs.
While the slaves agreed with slaveowners (and their supporters) on the importance of race, they arrived at their ideas about race by means of a different set of socio-psychological processes.
It is therefore not only the absence of the strong female "head of household" that distinguishes Nelson's situation from Willem's in Consecrated Ground: a significant part of Nelson's heritage includes both the culture and the bloodline of the plantation's white slaveowner, and the accompanying complexities of relationships and alliances add depth and layered resonances to the character's psychology.
Northern and Southern observers alike saw the decision, and the majority opinion written by Chief Justice (and former slaveowner) Roger B.
But the reform movements that thrived in the resulting language of egalitarianism--movements for the abolition of slavery and the rights of women, for example--had little to do with the real Andrew Jackson, who was both an unrepentant slaveowner and a devotee of an already antiquated cult of masculinity.
The plan for the revolt appears to have originated among the slaves of Esteban Alfonso, who besides a slaveowner was also a local official.
In "Ravine a Malheurs" (Reunion) the "White" is represented by the spirit of a slaveowner (Chapeau-la-Paille) who engages in a public "debate" with the spirit of a maroon slave (Madras-la-Soie) killed by her pursuers.
He has counted and listed every known Jewish slaveowner and slave trader in England and British America.
Rice, Early American Taverns: For the Entertainment of Friends and Strangers [Chicago, 1983].) He does cite one memorable example of female taverngoing in which a slaveowner, hunting for a runaway female slave, enters a Roxbury tavern where he reports finding "about a dozen black gentry, he's and she's in a room, in a very merry humour, singing and dancing...." Yet Conroy offers no further comment on this titillating tidbit', except to note that poor tavernkeepers sometimes encouraged such "covert gatherings" of slaves and servants "in their efforts to make a profit" (p.
In that work, Watson held that Thomas Jefferson's colonial ideal of the yeoman farmer gave way in the Old South to a more powerful myth, the patrician slaveowner. The emerging image of the Virginia Cavalier--aristocratic, chivalrous, and upright--formed the Tidewater's cultural self-concept, even though from the start the proclaimed linkage between Chesapeake planters and English Royalists was largely factitious.
It seems hard to explain how a slaveowner like Thomas Jefferson could declare that "all men are created equal." Nor is it obvious how 55 men in Philadelphia, some 30 of whom were slaveowners themselves, could proclaim antislavery principles while endorsing a document that would permit slavery to continue in the Southern states.