Slavery

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Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Christiane Bougerol has emphasized the way slavemasters perceived slave
It is the slavemaster who appears most beastly, while Max's character, refusing enslavement and assimilation, articulates the historical in-betweenness of the metis as a "liminal personality," or mediating presence, whose tragedy may enable the emergence of a newly reconstructed order.
While human rights are designed to protect and recognize life, slavery degrades both the slavemaster and the slave.
8) Of course, this more calculating image of the slave owner is also a far cry from the image of the slavemaster as a kindly and just father, which was a powerful myth in the antebellum South.
These remarks were echoed closely almost 120 years later when Malcolm X wrote that "[t]he white man's brains that today explore space should have told the slavemaster that any slave, if he is educated, will no longer fear his master.
He triumphantly evades her with fire, a bid for liberty which looks back to the fires lit at the Tolbooth door, and forward to his rebellion against his slavemaster.
Both games, for example, involve issuing and following commands; just as the builder commands his assistant to move slabs, so too the slavemaster Schoolteacher commands his pupils to line up Sethe's characteristics on the "correct" sides of the page.
What developed was a Christian religion of the slavemaster that emphasized belief in the Incarnation.
And like the slavemaster who assigns to his slaves "new and often ridiculous names" (Bush 24) in an attempt to separate them from their exotic cultures and dangerously alien social structures, Rochester renames Antoinette "Bertha," blasphemously baptising her the madwoman of Charlotte Bronte's Victorian attic.
In The Autobiography of Malcolm X, he further articulates this Nietzschean criticism of Christianity: This white man's Christian religion further deceived and brainwashed this "Negro" to always turn the other cheek, and grin, and scrape, and bow, and be humble, and to sing, and to pray, and to take whatever was dished out by the devilish white man; and to look for his pie in the sky, and for his heaven in the hereafter, while right here on earth the slavemaster white man enjoyed his heaven.
The religion that the slavemaster had intended for control of the slave's soul and mind became an instrument of liberation.
The men who run it are more comfortable with the insane idea that black men are just as guilty as the slavemaster for atrocities committed against black women, which is the lie promoted by Michiko Kakutani, who is an example of how "third world" tokens are used to do the dirty work that the establishment used to do.