skill

(redirected from Skills)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Skill

The ability to accurately forecast returns. We measure skill using the information coefficient.

Skill

The ability to perform a task well. For example, a locksmith has the skill to make new keys for customers' homes and cars. Skills are required to perform many jobs and employers will only hire persons who fit the required skill set. As a result, skilled workers are often more highly paid than unskilled workers.

skill

any competence possessed by someone; in an employment context it often refers to a combination of knowledge and manual dexterity amongst manual workers. JOBS are often categorized as skilled, semiskilled or unskilled according to the level of skills apparently required to perform them. However, many argue that there is a mismatch between skills that are actually necessary to perform certain jobs and the nomenclature of the job. Jobs classed as skilled may in reality require little skill (perhaps because of the introduction of new technology) whilst unskilled jobs may require more knowledge than is often recognized (tacit skills). It is therefore argued by some that skills are socially constructed. By defining certain jobs as skilled, entry to them can be restricted to those who possess certain recognized competencies or characteristics. If acquisition of these can be controlled then entry to the job can be restricted. In this way the rewards stemming from the job can be maintained at a high level. This has traditionally been the strategy of craft TRADE UNIONS and of PROFESSIONALS. See SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, TRAINING.

skill

any competence possessed by a person, although in an employment context it often refers to a combination of knowledge and manual dexterity among manual workers. JOB or work tasks are often categorized as skilled, semi-skilled or unskilled according to the level of skills apparently required to perform them.

A key factor in upgrading skills is investment in TRAINING, both in terms of the provision of general education facilities by the government and, more specifically ‘on-the-job’ or vocational training facilities by firms and by the government.

The general level of skills of a firm's LABOUR FORCE is an important factor in increasing PRODUCTIVITY while, more generally, the skills of the labour force, as embodied in HUMAN CAPITAL, contribute to the achievement of higher rates of ECONOMIC GROWTH.

References in classic literature ?
``Then, Locksley,'' said Prince John, ``thou shalt shoot in thy turn, when these yeomen have displayed their skill. If thou carriest the prize, I will add to it twenty nobles; but if thou losest it, thou shalt be stript of thy Lincoln green, and scourged out of the lists with bowstrings, for a wordy and insolent braggart.''
Hubert, who, as victor in the first trial of skill, had the right to shoot first, took his aim with great deliberation, long measuring the distance with his eye, while he held in his hand his bended bow, with the arrow placed on the string.
He began to peel this with great composure, observing at the same time, that to ask a good woodsman to shoot at a target so broad as had hitherto been used, was to put shame upon his skill. ``For his own part,'' he said, ``and in the land where he was bred, men would as soon take for their mark King Arthur's round-table, which held sixty knights around it.
If this yeoman can cleave that rod, I give him the bucklers or rather, I yield to the devil that is in his jerkin, and not to any human skill; a man can but do his best, and I will not shoot where I am sure to miss.
However it be, thou shalt not crow over us with a mere show of superior skill.''
The archer vindicated their opinion of his skill: his arrow split the willow rod against which it was aimed.
An old shirt was procured by Benjamin, and placed in the hand of the other, who tore divers bandages from it, with an exactitude that marked both his own skill and the importance of the operation.
These were arranged in due order by the side of the murderous saws, knives, and scissors, when Elnathan stretched his long body to its utmost elevation, placing his hand on the small of his back as if for sup port, and looked about him to discover what effect this display of professional skill was likely to produce on the spectators.
Such were the impressions of Remarkable on the subject; and such doubtless were the opinions of most of those who felt it necessary to entertain a species of religious veneration for the skill of Elnathan; but such was far from the truth.
In the questionnaire, alumni were asked "how would you rate the extent to which you needed or did not need to acquire the following skills in your college education?" A five-point scale was used as follows: (1) not needed, (2) somewhat needed, (3) much needed, (4) essential, and (5) Not sure.
A 10 YEAR plan to help Wales evolve into a highly-skilled nation and create the conditions that businesses need to grow and flourish was be launched yesterday by Deputy Minister for Skills Ken Skates.
ERIC Descriptors: Academic Achievement; State Standards; Communication Skills; Job Skills; Career Planning; Conflict Resolution; Research Skills; Academic Standards; Learner Engagement; Critical Thinking; Mathematics Achievement; Reading Achievement; Teamwork; Cooperation; Problem Solving; Ethics; Career Readiness; College Readiness; Alignment (Education)