skill

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Skill

The ability to accurately forecast returns. We measure skill using the information coefficient.

Skill

The ability to perform a task well. For example, a locksmith has the skill to make new keys for customers' homes and cars. Skills are required to perform many jobs and employers will only hire persons who fit the required skill set. As a result, skilled workers are often more highly paid than unskilled workers.

skill

any competence possessed by someone; in an employment context it often refers to a combination of knowledge and manual dexterity amongst manual workers. JOBS are often categorized as skilled, semiskilled or unskilled according to the level of skills apparently required to perform them. However, many argue that there is a mismatch between skills that are actually necessary to perform certain jobs and the nomenclature of the job. Jobs classed as skilled may in reality require little skill (perhaps because of the introduction of new technology) whilst unskilled jobs may require more knowledge than is often recognized (tacit skills). It is therefore argued by some that skills are socially constructed. By defining certain jobs as skilled, entry to them can be restricted to those who possess certain recognized competencies or characteristics. If acquisition of these can be controlled then entry to the job can be restricted. In this way the rewards stemming from the job can be maintained at a high level. This has traditionally been the strategy of craft TRADE UNIONS and of PROFESSIONALS. See SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, TRAINING.

skill

any competence possessed by a person, although in an employment context it often refers to a combination of knowledge and manual dexterity among manual workers. JOB or work tasks are often categorized as skilled, semi-skilled or unskilled according to the level of skills apparently required to perform them.

A key factor in upgrading skills is investment in TRAINING, both in terms of the provision of general education facilities by the government and, more specifically ‘on-the-job’ or vocational training facilities by firms and by the government.

The general level of skills of a firm's LABOUR FORCE is an important factor in increasing PRODUCTIVITY while, more generally, the skills of the labour force, as embodied in HUMAN CAPITAL, contribute to the achievement of higher rates of ECONOMIC GROWTH.

References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Skill Set #3 requires risk taking and flexible thinking, while also expanding students' ability to transfer knowledge.
To be effective all boards must address board leadership, board size, required skill sets, board member performance, and succession planning.
Merging the postal clerk and storekeeper ratings will give the PCs a viable career path, broader skill set, and increased advancement opportunity with no adverse effect on the SKs, according to Command Master Chief (SW) James A.
It may be that your goals do not include programming skills, and you don't use Skill Set No.
To increase the visibility of potential African American board members, the ELC is also in partnership with the National Association of Corporate Directors, and works toward registering members on the association's database--one of the primary sources companies use to seek eligible candidates in particular skill sets.
There must be an intermediary, an expert entrepreneur with the skill set necessary to get a product on the shelves, then off them and into people's homes and places of work.
Elementary school principals ranked teaching and learning as the top leadership skill set needed for improving and sustaining academic achievement in their urban school.
With Jeff, we raise the bar even higher because he brings a depth of knowledge and a skill set that will add tremendous value to our new development division.
Unlike other accreditation programs that relied on a single skill set or specified texts, the IABC program was based on a candidate's ability to respond to real-life problems.
Kasprisin says what he found difficult when seeking a position was not his skill set, but rather "the inherent bias of the hiring managers, who want to hire somebody with industry experience," which he dubs "the wrong approach.
And part of the strategy involves the opposite of planned obsolesce--you need to imagine the additional skills that will be necessary in the future so you are not just replicating yourself (today's successful skill set), but creating a skill set for future success.
They have to get together and take the pool of talent they have and determine where the skill sets are, because every individual has a different skill set.