Skid


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Skid

On a ship, a plank of timber set parallel to other planks in order to support weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
First he removed the hoses from both lift ports on the skid steer, leaving the other ends attached to the cylinders.
Henrik, my Swedish colleague, reported that in his country, for example, learning to control a skid on the skid pan is part and parcel of the driving test.
Then skid trails and cable lines were designed on maps with regard to these observations and also skid borders.
For stability, skids on lower containers should support a portion of the upper container weight when stacking.
Skid loaders have come a long way since the early 1960s, and virtually every equipment manufacturer has offered a line of loaders--many still do.
If mowing is your thing, choose from several finish and rough-country mowers designed to attach directly to a skid loader's quick attachment bracket--most are hydraulically powered.
This prompted Anglesey council's road safety team to invest Welsh Assembly money to tackle the issue with the skid course.
But it still hasn't translated to any real action other than Skid Row sweeps.
Both wheel loaders and skid steers bring specific advantages to an operation, says Neil LeBlanc, product and marketing manager at Caterpillar Inc.
A skid steer would get into many tight places that a wheel loader cannot," says Bob Beesely, product manager for skid steers and compact track loaders for Komatsu America Corp.
The upshot is the integration of skid platform technologies on a standard humvee that permits soldiers to experience a 60 miles per hour skid in a vehicle that is only going 15 miles per hour.
You have a limited amount of tyre grip available and your vehicle will skid when one or more of the tyres loses normal grip on the road.