Skewed distribution


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Skewed distribution

Probability distribution in which an unequal number of observations lie below (negative skew) or above (positive skew) the mean.

Skewed Distribution

A probability distribution where more data points lie on one side of the mean than the other. This means that the distribution will not form a bell curve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suspecting the skewed distribution of delay values as a potential influence, we compared the relationship between Total AUC and a number of Partial AUCs using different indifference points.
2014) heuristic may vary even for bell-shaped and right or left skewed distributions.
Since we assume a skewed distribution, the matching probability is not equal, but decreases in the tail of the distribution, as shown in Figure 3.
3), indicating that sampling efficiency based on a skewed distribution is more appropriate for these populations.
Figure 8 is the result for three symmetric distributions, and Figure 9 is the result for two symmetric and one skewed distribution.
For Reich, the root causes of the recent "great" recession are similar to those that caused that other "great" economic collapse of the 1930s: a wildly skewed distribution of income.
71 per cent in job offers, manufacturing sector had a highly skewed distribution of new job openings in the metros.
When corn paring income levels, median income is generally the most reliable measurement, as income tends to have a skewed distribution.
The Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of continuous variables with a skewed distribution if there were only 2 groups.
The Bartlett test does not fare well for data that follow a leptokurtic or skewed distribution (Overall & Woodward, 1974).
Scaling-up antiretroviral treatment to socially meaningful levels in low-income countries with a high AIDS burden is constrained by (1) the growing caseload of people to be maintained on long-term treatment, (2) problems of shortage and skewed distribution in the health workforce, and (3) the heavy workload involved in current treatment delivery models.