Sit-Down Strike

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Sit-Down Strike

A strike in which union members or, rarely, other employees, come to work but sit at their workstations and do not perform their duties. The purpose behind a sit-down strike is to make it difficult or impossible for the employer to hire replacement workers to replace the strikers. This is supposed to make the strike more effective. See also: Lock-out.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were 60 sit-down strikes in Chicago in the month of March alone.
Flint Sit-Down Strike occurs; UAW becomes collective bargaining agent at GM
The reader, for example, is meant to credit the one newspaper account of the sit-down strike that the strikers deem accurate and which calls the issue of unemployment "a national responsibility demanding action by national authority and on a nation-wide scale.
Gallup polls showed that most Americans agreed: 67 percent of the public wanted sit-down strikes declared illegal, and 65 percent favored the forcible removal of strikers.
They show that when workers in Gdansk, Gdynia, and Szczecin took to the streets (where a repressive party-state ultimately has all of the advantages) in the early days of the December protests, the Polish Communist Party's decision to use force against workers (officially 45 people were killed, although unofficial estimates have placed the number of dead as high as 200-300) helped workers to rediscover the advantages of the sit-down strike.
Government statistics on sit-down strikes indicated that nearly half a million workers had engaged in such strikes since Sept.
The sit-down strikes and bloody confrontations of 1937 notwithstanding, Lewis remained profoundly pro-capitalist, and, along with the rest of the CIO leadership, went to great lengths to demonstrate that industrial unionism was prepared to shoulder the responsibility of making American basic industry a more stable and efficient undertaking.
55) While unionization rates are traditionally lower in retail than in manufacturing, retail workers have formed unions since as early as 1890 in Michigan, and one of the large sit-down strikes in 1937 took place in the Woolworth's retail chain in Detroit.
Automobile and other industrial workers had won union recognition through sit-down strikes.
Isolated sit-down strikes still plagued industry, but public opinion seemed to swing against these tactics, so unions stopped them entirely.
It is ironic that the union born of the sit-down strikes of the 1930s was not able to see that the go-it-alone tactics of the last decades are no match for the powerful employer onslaught of the 1980s and 1990s.
In Philadelphia, 5,000 workers engaged in sit-down strikes lasting about 4 hours before settling with eight hospitals and several clinics.