Single

(redirected from Single Taxpayer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Single

In American taxation, the filing status for a legally unmarried person who does not qualify for any other filing status. In other words, single is the default filing status. This may affects one's tax liability; for example, single filers have lower income limits for most exemptions.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Single

The filing status used by an unmarried taxpayer who does not qualify for any other filing status.
Copyright © 2008 H&R Block. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission from H&R Block Glossary
References in periodicals archive ?
For single taxpayers, the phaseout range began at $118,000 and ended at $133,000; for married filing jointly, the range was $ 186,000-$ 196,000, again giving a significant advantage to those who were single.
(7) Thus, contrary to the statement in the preamble that Congress "did not make clear how sections 41(f)(1) and 41(c)(7) interact," the foregoing excerpt of the explanation of the 1989 statutory changes demonstrates that Congress understood that the single taxpayer rule would be applied in determining the amount of a taxpayer's gross receipts in situations where the "single taxpayer" was comprised of both foreign and domestic controlled corporations.
(8.) For instance, a single taxpayer with taxable income between EUR 9,252 and EUR 55,007 will be subject to a marginal tax rate that varies between 23.02 and 48.5 percent, depending on the income of the taxpayer.
Tax Year 28% 31% 36% 39.6% 2001 27.5% 30.5% 35.5% 39.1% 2002 27.0% 30.0% 35.0% 38.6% 2003 27.0% 30.0% 35.0% 38.6% 2004 26.0% 29.0% 34.0% 37.6% 2005 26.0% 29.0% 34.0% 37.6% 2006 25.0% 28.0% 33.0% 35.0% Single Taxpayers (7) If taxable income is: The tax is: but not of the amount Over-- over-- over-- $0 $26,250 15% $0 26,250 63,550 $3,937.50 + 28% 26,250 63,550 132,600 14,381.50 + 31% 63,550 132,600 288,350 35,787.00 + 36% 132,600 288,350 ...
Figure 1 illustrates the relationship between the effective capital gains tax rate and AGI levels for a single taxpayer with $10,000 of qualifying deductions subject to the phase-out penalty and who claims from one to six personal exemptions.
For single taxpayers the limitation is $65,000 and $130,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.
A single taxpayer who had $50,000 of taxable income paid roughly $8,579 in taxes last year with a standard deduction.
In addition, the 15 percent tax rate for a single taxpayer extends to $26,250 of taxable income but that amount is not double for married filing jointly taxpayers but is extended only to taxable income of $43,850 (167.048% of the amount for a single taxpayer instead of 200 percent of the amount for a single taxpayer).
A single taxpayer who has a modified adjusted gross income of $80,000 or less ($160,000 for joint filers), is eligible for the full credit.
Thus, we commend LMSB's efforts to ensure that no single taxpayer, group of taxpayers, or other industry "representatives" are accorded exclusive access to the IIR process.
You also should believe that you won't be taking the standard deduction: $12,000 this year for Ivan, a single taxpayer.
If a single taxpayer has combined income under $25,000, Social Security benefits will not be taxed; however, taxation begins at $32,000 of combined income on a joint return.