Singaporean Dollar


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Singaporean Dollar

The currency of Singapore. It was issued in 1965 after the end of the currency union between Singapore, Brunei and Malaysia. It was, at different times, pegged to the British pound, the U.S. dollar and a currency basket. Since 1995, it has been a managed float currency. It is interchangeable with the Brunei dollar.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the South Korean won strengthened against the greenback by 10.5 percent; the Thai baht and the Malaysian ringgit, up 10 percent; the New Taiwan dollar, up 7.7 percent; the Singaporean dollar, up 7 percent; the Indian rupee, up 5.4 percent; the Chinese yuan, up 4.9 percent, and the Japanese yen, up 3.1 percent.
The volatility of the Singaporean dollar was a higher 1.19 percent; 1.49 percent for the Thai baht; 1.64 percent for the Malaysian ringgit; 1.77 percent for the Japanese yen, and 1.9 percent for the South Korean won.
Korean won and Singaporean dollar scored even higher appreciation against the U.S.
'Aside from recorded declines in cash remittances in original currency in these countries, the lower US-dollar value of remittances in April could be partly due to the depreciation of major host-countries' currencies vis-a-vis the US dollar such as the Singaporean dollar, Australian dollar, pound sterling and the euro,' Tetangco said.
Also, 'aside from recorded declines in cash remittances in original currency in these countries, the lower US-dollar value of remittances in April could be partly due to the depreciation of major host-countries' currencies vis-a-vis the US dollar, such as the Singaporean dollar, Australian dollar, pound sterling and the euro,' Tetangco said.
As of March 31, the South Korean won appreciated 7.93 percent against the US dollar; the Japanese yen, up 4.62 percent; the Thai baht, up 4.02 percent; the Singaporean dollar, up 3.58 percent; the Malaysian ringgit, up 1.43 percent; the Indonesian rupiah, up 1.11 percent; and the Chinese yuan, up 0.79 percent.
So too did the Thai baht, Singaporean dollar, Japanese yen and South Korean won, Guerrero said.
The end-2016 peso-dollar closing rate of 49.72:$1 was weaker than end-2015's 47.06:$1, or a depreciation of 5.35 percent year-on-year, tracking regional currencies like the Chinese yuan, Malaysian ringgit, Indian rupee, Korean won and Singaporean dollar.
The end-2016 peso-dollar closing rate of 49.72:$1 was weaker than end-2015's 47.06:$1, hence depreciating by 5.35 percent year-on-year, tracking regional currencies such as the Chinese yuan, Malaysian ringgit, Indian rupee, Korean won and Singaporean dollar.
Trinidad argued the peso's real effective exchange rate (REER) index, a trade weighted benchmark of currency competitiveness, would have to closely track the REER of four Southeast Asian countries: Malaysian ringgit, Indonesian rupiah, Singaporean dollar, Thai baht and Chinese renminbi.
The Malaysian ringgit, the Singaporean dollar and the South Korean won also depreciated against the US dollar year-to-date, while the Japanese yen, Indonesian rupiah and Thai baht strengthened against the greenback.
The Indonesian rupiah weakened by 0.23 percent, the Malaysian ringgit fell by 0.91 percent, the Singaporean dollar dropped 1.08 percent, and the Japanese yen dropped 6.52 percent.