Sine Wave

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Sine Wave

Any curve plotted along an axis where the y-value moves above and below zero at a rate of y = sin(x). The Composite Index of Lagging Indicators is thought to be roughly a sine wave because interest rates and inflation, which make up the index, move in relation to each other in a way resembling the sine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The total harmonic distortion percentages of the 1 kHz sine waves were measured with a stand-alone FFT analyzer that produced a display that reflects the parameters of frequency on the horizontal axis and amplitude on the vertical axis.
The 1 kHz sine wave was chosen because it is a repetitive, simple signal located near the maximum energy frequency of speech (Levitt and Webster 1991).
The THD percentage was determined for the clipped and restored 1 kHz sine wave recordings, allowing a detailed measurement of the harmonic distortion of the single discrete signal.
If a sine wave voltage is applied across a resistor, the current will also be a sine wave.
A sine wave voltage waveform leads to a cosine current waveform.
There is evidence the results may be somewhat different when sine waves at several frequencies are applied simultaneously, as happens in the real world.
Currently the standard test procedure is to measure the stiffness for sine wave input at a regular series of frequencies, for example every 10 hz from 0 hz to 200 hz.
The S-Parameters are a measure of the sine waves that scattered off the device, either reflecting back from the incident port or scattering into any other ports that might be connected.
The solution is to borrow an approach used in the RF world: that is, to use the interactions of precision sine wave signals with the connector to characterize its performance.
If a sine wave enters a port, there are only three qualities of it that can change when it comes out again; its frequency, amplitude or phase could be affected.
The cost and effort of digging up these things and then cutting the rocks in the correct way to expose the sine waves is huge," he says.
By counting the number of laminae in one cycle of a sine wave, Awramik and Vanyo estimate there were 435 days per year during the late Proterozoic.