Sin Tax

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Sin Tax

A tax on a good or service considered socially or ethically undesirable. For example, a government may levy a tax on the sale of alcohol. A sin tax finances programs to discourage the undesirable practice (in this example, it may fund anti-teen drinking programs). However, a sin tax may simply be a way for a government to generate revenue from something people are expected to do anyway.
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While Johnson is willing to defend our sugary drinks and milky ice cream, he has stopped short of rolling back the original sin taxes on alcohol and tobacco.
"Sin taxes have also been highly effective in improving public health in the past and in the current environment could be structured to raise substantial revenue and prevent both medical overuse and chronic diseases," he said.
One reason politicians turn to sin taxes is that they often face less public opposition than other kinds of taxes.
READ:DOF prods Senate: Increase sin taxes The Department of Finance proposed to add P60 excise tax on every pack of cigarettes and additional P40 excise tax for every liter of alcohol.
President Duterte urged smokers, especially the young ones, to quit smoking and live longer after noticing the high tobacco consumption despite higher sin taxes.
A preliminary version of the President's health care reform plan has been released, and includes unspecified "sin taxes" as a source of revenue.
For his part, Drilon deplored that local tobacco farmers were not getting their share from the so-called sin taxes.
He said the priority measures to be tackled included the increase in sin taxes on tobacco products.
DOH, DOF make final push for higher sin taxes !-- -- MANILA, Philippines The Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Finance (DOF) are making a final push to get Congress to approve higher taxes for alcohol and tobacco products.
For alcoholic beverages, sin taxes amounted to P49.36 billion at end-September, higher by 24 percent compared with the P39 billion goal, which is also an increase of 15 percent year-on-year from P42 billion.
Sin taxes are the traditional first refuge for beleaguered legislators.
Saturnino Distor, president of the Philippine Tobacco Growers Association, said tobacco farmers were made to believe that the yearly hike in sin taxes was to enable the government to collect enough fund to finance government programs.