Siege Economy


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Siege Economy

An economy under such heavy government regulation that it cannot function properly. Examples of circumstances that may result in a siege economy include excessive taxes or laws that prevent growth. The appropriate amount of government intervention in an economy remains highly controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
(27.) Sadaki, "The Siege Economy of Eastern Ghouta"; and "Survey of Syria's agriculture sector reveals impact of war," F4O, 4 March 2017, http://www.fao.org/emergencies/fao-in-action/sto-ries/stories-detail/en/c/878242/.
Proceeds from the sale of the animals were used to feed 7500 of the city's schoolchildren.(39) For the constituents they served, the improvisations of local bureaucrats ameliorated the worst effects of the siege economy. They also, as few historians have acknowledged, sustained the long war effort.
Hennessy cites approvingly the experience of World War II, when Whitehall successfully drafted in squads of outsiders to help run a siege economy. At a crucial meeting in March 1946, the head of the civil service, Sir Edward Bridges, opted to go back to career insiders even though the job of the civil service, like the role of government, had become manifestly bigger and more managerial.
The papers released today capture the febrile mood as the negotiations with the IMF unfolded, with left-wingers like Energy Secretary Tony Benn demanding the rejection of the IMF terms and the creation of a 'siege economy'.
It was not until the 1960s that the government started to take measures which increased national prosperity by changing the country's economic system from a siege economy to an international trading one.