Sidelines


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Sidelines

Hypothetical position referring to noninvolvement in a stock; merely watching.

Sidelines

1. Describing investors who believe that the markets are too volatile to risk their money. They therefore keep their money in short-term, low-risk investments until the markets are perceived to have calmed down. Investors on the sidelines usually have lower risk tolerance than investors who keep their money in the markets during these times.

2. Describing investors who are watching a security instead of taking a position on it.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article presents the first evidence of a successful sideline pressure in sports.
The teacher will choose two students from the sidelines to be dingoes.
He admitted the sidelines are getting crowded and that the NFL is always looking at its field credentialing policies.
Billy's ban is all the more laughable when one looked at Micko patrolling the sideline on Sunday also on the back of a ban.
At the same time, many traditional, entrepreneurial recyclers and processors of metals and paper were not convinced of the profits to be made from handling plastic, and so stayed on the sidelines or were marginally involved in the segment.
With one or no time-outs, the offense will be forced to work the sidelines and avoid running plays that can eat up time.
As the official bottled water of the NCAA, DASANI-branded carts and coolers will be the only branded product on the sidelines at the NCAA Final Four.
The sidelines, yard lines, and hash marks provide natural reference points and visual indicators.
The result is that CEO's and individual investors are waiting on the sidelines to spend or invest.
With their senior captain watching from the sidelines, the top-seeded Mounties responded with a 14-point run over the next 3 minutes, 42 seconds.
Dismiss the interior linemen (still against no defense) and have ball-carriers (a) run to the sidelines where they are assured of getting out-of-bounds, (b) stay in-bounds and run for as many yards as possible, and (c) upon making first downs, forget about the sideline and make all the yards possible -- letting the first downs stop the clock.
Westwood One/CBS Radio Sports' Monday Night NFL commentators Howard David and Boomer Esiason will provide complete play-by-play coverage with John Dockery and James Lofton reporting from the sidelines.