footprint

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footprint

The area of land physically occupied by a building, including its square footage and shape.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Notable collaborations between CSAFE and NIST have resulted in the following joint achievements: new automated algorithms for bullet, shoeprint, and glass comparisons that improve the accuracy of forensic analysis; creation of databases, acquisition systems, and phone apps for forensic evidence collection and quality assessment; and successful training of forensic practitioners to improve their quantitative literacy.
When Richard became the Wine Director at The Little Nell in Aspen, Colorado, he had little problem filling in the large shoeprints left by the departing, Bobby Stuckey.
This color-illustrated textbook for students in forensics explains techniques, equipment, and materials for gathering evidence of fingerprints, shoeprints, blood impressions, and other evidence on the skin.
Budding forensic scientists will use real techniques such as identifying fingerprints and shoeprints, viewing hair fibre under a microscope and examining soil, rocks and algae.
Meanwhile, people and animals have taken liberties with the car, with shoeprints and paw prints visible on the vehicle body.
"They were beaten with police batons and some had army shoeprints on their faces."
His very shoeprints persist in the lunar soil, representing a height of human achievement.
Two shoeprints detected in his kitchen were too "partial" for the size or wearer to be identified, she went on.
He would later testify that after entering the store a second time with the chief of police, he noticed something he hadn't the first time: bloody shoeprints.
Topics that may be explored include the importance of eyewitness testimonies (maybe someone on the train saw Fred commit the crime); alibis (maybe George was visiting other friends at the time the crime was committed); and collection of alternative types of physical evidence, such as shoeprints (maybe the twins wear different types of shoes and this evidence could link one of them to the crime scene).