Shirking


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Related to Shirking: stand pat, resubmit, call on, diverting, stationed

Shirking

The tendency to do less work when the return is smaller. Owners may have more incentive to shirk if they issue equity as opposed to debt, because they retain less ownership interest in the company and therefore may receive a smaller return. Thus, shirking is considered an agency cost of equity.

Shirking

The act of working less when there is no chance of earning a higher return. For example, a company may have punitive taxes levied on it if its profits are considered excessive. The owners of the company therefore have an incentive to shirk their responsibilities and to not work as hard as they otherwise would. Likewise, employees who are paid poorly may shirk their responsibilities since there is no incentive rewarding hard work.

shirking

see TEAM PRODUCTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those players who are less likely to sign a subsequent contract have a greater level of shirking throughout the contract period.
11) The economic meaning of the two categories--the employed but shirking and the unemployed-is identical in the model: the person does not produce anything.
2002) found no evidence of shirking on a player's subsequent durability.
To establish whether individual shirking has occurred in professional sports would require some information about the specific contract and an observation of a drop-off in performance (an inefficient outcome) that might be attributed to actions by the player not in the best interests of the owner.
Yet, Uslaner moves beyond contemporary analyses of shirking by estimating a multiple-equation model of roll-call behavior, and he also exploits some additional sources, including a CBS poll of Senate incumbents.
In reading this paper, I was curious to know whether there was a simple mapping between its shirking interpretation and the specific capital basis of other work.
Actions by players that may be considered shirking stem from multiple sources.
In the absence of unemployment, a worker caught shirking and subsequently fired could obtain a new job at the market wage without difficulty.
To maintain simplicity, it is assumed that, at any particular time, a worker either works or shirks and that a shirking worker produces nothing.
Before that law, states had been shirking their responsibilities so that about a million disabled kids were receiving no education at all, let alone a segregated, inferior one.
Now that they have been caught in non-compliance, it is disturbing that the State is indignantly shirking its responsibility to protect shoreline environments, and insisting on a bond that the homeowners can never afford to pay," said Berman.