Shirking


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Related to Shirking: stand pat, resubmit, call on, diverting, stationed

Shirking

The tendency to do less work when the return is smaller. Owners may have more incentive to shirk if they issue equity as opposed to debt, because they retain less ownership interest in the company and therefore may receive a smaller return. Thus, shirking is considered an agency cost of equity.

Shirking

The act of working less when there is no chance of earning a higher return. For example, a company may have punitive taxes levied on it if its profits are considered excessive. The owners of the company therefore have an incentive to shirk their responsibilities and to not work as hard as they otherwise would. Likewise, employees who are paid poorly may shirk their responsibilities since there is no incentive rewarding hard work.

shirking

see TEAM PRODUCTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
alternative wage in case of getting fired), q the probability of being caught shirking, b the probability of termination of working post (exogenous, with no relation to effort), u the unemployment rate, and r the rate of interest used for discounting future to present value.
When he intentionally failed to return on time, he was shirking it.
Agents of a firm, however, will not internalize all of the costs of shirking: The principal reaps part of the value of hard work by the agent, but the agent receives all of the value of shirking.
It's an interesting piece, especially when applied to the shirking rates of politicians who like to consider themselves average workers in the confines of D.
As noted in the literature, even if a player wished to reduce effort, shirking within the course of a game may be difficult.
Using his theoretical construct, Feaver's look at civil-military relations during the Cold War reveals, despite "quibbles over how to code and interpret complex concepts like shirking or expectations of punishment," that the military worked (they expected the costs for shirking to be high) under intrusive monitoring (costs to do so were low while unintrusive monitoring was not very reliable).
That needs partnership and compromise, not shirking of responsibilities, or else the town will be left with a white elephant.
This time, the change reduces the number of students a school may test without shirking the law.
On the flipside, Bach credited markets such as Pittsburgh, Miami, Orlando and tampa as dodging the sublease bullet by shirking the false promises of a "new economy.
It covers mostly skateboard ng but you will find some surfing and snow brucing in there as well It's got a no BS attitude shirking many of.
Lowe of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and her colleagues offered a clue to why aged muscle is weaker: In older muscle, a key protein, myosin, is shirking its job.
In particular, it is more difficult (costly) to detect shirking in larger firms, ceteris paribus.