Toxin

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Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
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Mucus-activatable Shiga toxin genotype stx2d in Escherichia coli O157:H7.
Real-time fluorescence PCR assays for detection and characterization of Shiga toxin, intimin, and enterohemolysin genes from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.
The test is rapid and has a good potential for shiga toxin detection since it can detect the presence of shiga toxin-producing E.
Second, laboratories that detect shiga toxin by antigen or molecular methods should also perform culture on sorbitol-MacConkey or MacConkey agar to recover the strain(s) for typing, which has major public health significance and may be clinically useful as well in some cases.
DeMaria said the main concern is that treating diarrhea caused by the Shiga toxin strain with antibiotics could be a factor in precipitating the kidney disease, so antibiotics should be avoided, if possible.
These bacteria can produce large amounts of the Shiga toxin and release it into the surrounding environment.
Detection of Shiga toxin Escherichia coli by PCR in cattle in Argentina.
75%) isolates were identified as shiga toxin producing E.
Identification and characterization of a new variant of shiga toxin 1 in Escherichia coli ONT:H19 of bovine origin.
It has been demonstrated that Shiga toxin induces apoptosis (Sandvig, 2001) The phenomenon of apoptosis begins with striking changes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus.
The increased risk is likely due to the antibiotic's liberation of shiga toxin, she noted.
Those on how phages contribute to virulence include lambdoid phages and shiga toxin, the prophage arsenal of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, pathogenic vibrios, Bordetella and mycoplasma phages, mycobacteriophages, phage involvement with bacterial vaginosis, botulism, and diphtheria, and staphylococcal, streptococcal, pneumococcal phages.