Sherman Antitrust Act

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Sherman Antitrust Act

The first legislation passed in the United States limiting trusts and monopolies. The Act prohibits agreements and collusion restricting trade, without providing many specifics. The Act was largely unenforced against the organizations it was intended to curtail. Indeed, the Act was invoked early on to restrict organized labor more than any other group. As a result, Congress passed the Clayton Act in 1914 to clarify American antitrust law. The Sherman Act has been criticized by many, notably Ayn Rand and her followers, for unfairly and inefficiently restricting the Invisible Hand of the market.
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Sherman Antitrust Act

An 1890 federal antitrust law intended to control or prohibit monopolies by forbidding certain practices that restrain competition. In the early 1900s, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Act applied only to unreasonable restraints of trade and thus could be used only against blatant cases of monopoly.
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Sherman Antitrust Act

One of the antitrust laws designed to encourage competition and discourage monopolies.

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References in periodicals archive ?
ANTITRUST LAWS AND RELATED ISSUES 1890 Sherman Antitrust Act 1911 Standard Oil Co.
According to the American Antitrust Institute, "merger control in moderately concentrated sectors appears to have virtually ceased." Enforcement of Section 2 of the Sherman Antitrust Act fell from an average of 15.7 cases per year from 1970 to 1999 to less than three per year over the period of 2000 to 2014.
The Senate has also revived legislation which would amend the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890.
In 2010, the federal government and a handful of states took several credit card companies to court, claiming that the anti-steering provisions violated the Sherman Antitrust Act.
The PCA is the Philippine version of the US Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890, and the competition provisions of the Treaty for the Functioning of the European Union.
In 1890, these interest groups succeeded in getting Congress to pass the Sherman Antitrust Act, a law that was ostensibly aimed at protecting consumers from monopolies but in reality served as a fig leaf for a huge protective-tariff hike.
He is best remembered today for authoring the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890.)
(21) In considering the second step, note that Congress has not imposed many limits on the Lanham Act's extraterritorial application and therefore the limits of the Act must be analyzed through precedent that has previously been applied to the Sherman Antitrust Act.
The main theme of the Supreme Court ruling was that the Sherman Antitrust Act did apply to the insurance industry.
Or suppose you want to understand the historical significance of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has published a Statement of Enforcement Principles Regarding "Unfair Methods of Competition applicable under Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act." The statement describes the underlying antitrust principles that guide FTC's application of its statutory authority over unfair methods of competition --even if these methods are not necessarily prohibited under the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 or the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914.