Shrapnel

(redirected from Shell fragments)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Shrapnel

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for loose coins in one's pocket.
References in periodicals archive ?
An artillery shell fragment, pocketknife, percussion caps, and friction primers (recovered from the monument site during construction of the memorial) were also enclosed as reminders of what had occurred there in 1863.
Oyster shell fragments, on the other hand, had a very low ratio; that is, a bulk volume of shell fragments had much less void volume than the other material types.
Polychaetes, shell fragments, copepods and fish fragments were more frequent in the intestine.
But on the far side of the island lies the wonderful Shell Beach, a long, thin stretch of white sand and tiny shell fragments.
E[currency]ANLIURFA (CyHAN)- With the holes and other damage caused by bullets and shell fragments to its buildings, Ceylanpynar, a town on the Syrian border, by all appearances is one in the middle of an armed conflict.
This included 38 surface or subsurface samples comprising 26 Velesunio ambiguus shell fragments collected between 0--4 cm in depth ('surface samples'); 10 V.
After 14 days, the shell fragments were removed, rinsed in deionized water (to remove excess salt), air-dried in a fume hood overnight, and weighed.
But archaeologist Martha Cuevas said the jade and shell fragments seen on the video are "part of a funerary costume.
The entire area under the tree was littered with chewed nut caps, shell fragments, and fresh deer droppings.
He finished the war mentally scarred but without major physical injuries: Doctors removed 12 of 15 shell fragments from his legs, while the rest, they told him, would remain in his limbs forever.
Shell fragments were also not found in the victim, the official told Al-Liwaa.
The unusually large sample of 270 engraved shell fragments, mostly excavated over the past several years at Diepkloof Rock Shelter in South Africa, displays two standard design patterns, says archaeologist Pierre-Jean Texier of the University of Bordeaux 1 in Talence, France.