sewer

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Related to Sewers: Combined sewer

sewer

A system for the transmission of storm water to a controlled discharge point or for the transmission of sanitary wastewater to a treatment facility.

References in periodicals archive ?
The city's current combined sewer system poses numerous issues, the most significant being a lack of efficiency in the treatment of water at the pump station.
Yorkshire Water has now set up a PS40,000 community fund for charities in a bid to build ties with local communities and spread the word about sewer problems and what can be done to prevent them.
That's the total of New York State and federal grants that will finance Suffolk County's largest sewer capacity increase since the scandal-plagued Southwest Sewer District expansion in the 1970's.
Sonko on Friday said the project will be fast-tracked in order to unclog the sewer line in Kariobangi North Primary which has been submerged for the last four months.
* G100: Local Sewer Rehabilitation 1--a $5.25 million contract for the rehabilitation of approximately 140 manholes and the replacement of existing sewer mains throughout the District of Columbia.
SEWER works in Sutton Coldfield are due to be finished for Easter with Rosemary Hill Road re-opened tomorrow.
Prior to October 2011, all sewers - where the drains for two or more properties combine - laid before 1937 were the responsibility of the water companies by virtue of the Public Health Act 1936.
He said much of the Granite Street area is without public sewers, which has hindered potential development efforts there.
When combined sewer systems were introduced in 1855, they were hailed as a vast improvement over urban cesspool ditches that ran along city streets and spilled over when it rained.
The MPs said nearly half of all sewer floods are caused by blocked sewers, often as a result of households and businesses disposing of inappropriate items, such as nappies and cooking fat.
The pipebursting process enables a city to enlarge the size of its sewers without excavating.
The small-diameter pipes eliminate expensive deep digging required for septic tanks and gravity sewers.