GI Bill

(redirected from Servicemen's Readjustment Act)
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GI Bill

Now called the Montgomery GI Bill, it offers support for veterans seeking postsecondary education.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bill Commemoration Week and celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly known as the G.I.
Roosevelt signs into law the original GI Bill, or Servicemen's Readjustment Act, ushering in monumental changes in U.S.
"Governor Stelle's work and efforts to ensure the passage of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 is well-documented.
Colmery is considered the principal architect of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, which established the World War II-era GI Bill.
In the US, the 1944 Servicemen's Readjustment Act (better known as the GI Bill) was a success because it provided training for those most in need of it, enabling returning World War Two veterans to reenter the productive economy.
The original GI Bill, or the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, as it is formally known, transformed American life.
Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the ''GI Bill of Rights.''
(2) The term GI [Government Issue] Bill, which originally referred to the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (Public Law 78-347), is now used to describe a range of benefits, including financial assistance for a college education.
The need for rehabilitation counselors was further strengthened with the passing of the 1943 Disabled Veterans Act and the 1944 Servicemen's Readjustment Act, which arose as a result of World War II [3].
After the Second World War, the USA brought in something called The Servicemen's Readjustment Act - popularly known as the "GI Bill" which guaranteed returning service people education, training or support to set up their own business.
The Servicemen's Readjustment Act (1944), known also as the G.I.

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