Serif

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Serif

In typography, a small mark attached to a letter. Serifs do not alter the meanings of letters. They are decorative and are not present in some fonts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other adjectives employed in these distinctions between Gill's type and those of the Germans are revealing: the geometric sans serifs are "unfeeling," "cold," "irrational," and "dehumanized."
The take-home message of the present paper is straightforward: In a normal reading setting (at least in single-sentence reading with participants with normal vision), the presence of serifs does not impact on reading fluency.
On the other hand, paid-for papers use classics mastheads in capital letters, with heavy Serif typefaces, black over white backgrounds (the exception is La Vanguardia, which designed the masthead in white over a blue background), and some elegant detail in colour, which are characteristics that give them an image of quality.
It should horizontally extend to the right of the stem similarly to the serif in serif designs and enough to be visible at small size but not too long to cause spacing problems for sans serif designs.
Sans serif type-faces usually require more line spacing than serif typefaces.
For ages, they have been willing to throw down over the merits of serif versus sans-serif typefaces.
The results from research on the effects of the presence or absence of serifs on the legibility of print seem to be inconclusive.
First, use sans serif fonts like Arial, Verdana, and Lucinda Grande for signs, PowerPoint headings, titles, outlines, and so on.
In itself, it provides a middling-to-bad example of Web typography because it appears in an oversize sans serif face.
Forget the fancy script styles and stick to an easy to read typeface without serifs. (Serifs are the little lines at the tops and bottoms of letters in some type styles.
* distinguish between traditional old style, transitional and modern serifs.
Both typefaces could be used in smaller type sizes; Times New Roman because of its design and (shape of) serifs, and Arial because of its design and higher x-height.