Serif

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Serif

In typography, a small mark attached to a letter. Serifs do not alter the meanings of letters. They are decorative and are not present in some fonts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of larger headings in Sans Serif typefaces and much more pronounced hierarchies confirm that the free newspapers prefer a much more sensationalist design than the paid-for papers do.
This is what the public loved about the city and what was made concretely clear through three simple letters in slab serif typeface and the universal symbol for love, the heart.
More than 25 years ago, a National Review article entitled "Why Johnny Can't Read," by Vrest Orton, argued that sans serif typefaces make printed text unreadable.
Sans serif typeface: Franklin Gothic Extra-Condensed.
sans serif typeface, "Easy ways to add impact with images," and a brief piece on the effects various colors have on readers;
There's something almost sensual about a beautiful serif typeface set against a white background.
Also consider choosing typefaces from among the growing number of faces that are being designed specifically for display on screen (see Figure 6), such as Verdana, a sans serif typeface, and Georgia, a serif face.
While Parker pointed out that the text point size--8/11 1/2--borders on the small, the "sturdy, low-stress, no-frills serif typeface enhances readability.
The design elements of the book itself confirm Parker's intention to remain in the forefront of books in the field: watermarks, generous white space, the liberal use of sans serif typeface and dark gray subheadings (particularly in checklists and the chapter on the architecture of type), and the unfortunately smaller point size of the body text.
"I learned about serif and sans serif typefaces, about varying and the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great.
Are the somewhat generic modern era sans serif typefaces Venus (1907), DIN 1451 (1936), and Highway Gothic (1949) too close to our own time to be considered revival types?" Why is that?
These include Tanseek, one of the first harmonious ranges of Arabic-Latin serif and sans serif typefaces, in collaboration with Monotype Imaging and Latin typography experts Dave Farey and Richard Dawson of Panache Typography, as well as Boutros-URW Franklin Gothic Arabic, Boutros-URW Futura Arabic, and most recently, Boutros-URW Futura Con Arabic.