Semiconductor

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Semiconductor

Any substance that conducts electricity more slowly than a conductor. Semiconductors are common in products like computer chips and, as such, may be traded as commodities. Silicon and germanium are both semiconductors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Gintautas Tamulaitis is a professor and the head of the Department of Semiconductor Physics and a leading researcher of the Applied Physics Institute at Vilnius University.
It says: "It's a little known fact that Ms Spears is an expert in semiconductor physics.
Specific topics include semiconductor physics, the p-n junction diode, photon emission and absorption, solar cells, light emitting diodes, and organic semiconductors, OLEDS, and solar cells.
The second edition of this list of industry standards for infrared optoelectronic applications has been updated to reflect new developments in semiconductor physics. Editors Birtalan, a vice president of an optoelectronic firm, has joined with Nunley, a noted innovator in the semiconductor field, to gather reviews from fellow experts on LED and silicon sensor fabrication and packaging, ultraviolet LEDs and white LED light for the conversion of SSL from convention sources.
This device could be on the market in two years' time, said Professor Pepper, head of the Semiconductor Physics Group at Cambridge University's Cavendish Laboratory and the scientific director at TeraView.
"The data suggest there's new semiconductor physics here that people may have missed," Awschalom says.
The text begins by reviewing basic principles of transmission lines, circuits and semiconductor physics. It progresses to two-terminal solid-state devices, circuits and applications, and finally to three-terminal devices.
If the designer conforms to the rules, he can operate in a purely digital world and forget that in reality the transistors are analog devices whose behavior is only to be properly understood by those with a knowledge of semiconductor physics. Present-day chip designers need no more than a smattering of such knowledge.
He expects readers to have working knowledge in basic mathematics such as complex variables and partial differential equations; some skill in computer programming; and intermediate to advance courses in electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and solid-state and semiconductor physics. Starting with superlattices, he progresses through resonant tunneling with artificial quantum well states; optical properties and Raman scattering in artificial quantum systems; dielectric function and doping of a superlattice; quantum step and activation energy; semiconductor atomic superlattices; silicon quantum dots; capacitance, dielectric constant, and doping quantum dots; porous silicon; some novel devices; the quantum impedance of a electrons; and why super and why nano.

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