Sell off

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Sell off

Sale of securities under pressure. See: Dumping.

Sell Off

The rapid sale of a security by a large number of holders. This increases the supply of the security available for sale and therefore drives down the price. Sell-offs occur for a number of reasons. A stock may drop suddenly in price if its company issues a negative earnings report, or if there are reports of a new technology rendering the company's product obsolete, or if the company's costs rise. Sell-offs also happen for other, perhaps less rational reasons. For example, a natural disaster, which may or may not affect supplies, can cause a sell-off. See also: Panic Sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
I do not deny that Blair and Brown carried on selling off playing fields in the later 1990s.
As we reveal today, the city council is currently considering selling off up to pounds 9m of property in a bid to ease its financial crisis.
But Ms Spelman has now told the Commons Environment Select Committee that the sale of 15 per cent of public forests will go forward, selling off more than 35,000 hectares between now and 2015.
But the force would only consider selling off old police houses when and if they became available, she added.
The Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE: RBS) is close to selling off its Asian assets.
Fellow Labour councillor Fred Johnson said: "They will be selling off the patches of green on the roundabouts next."
"It's not like the state is selling off its own assets; it's setting off someone else's," he says.
They are selling off `ecological subdivisions' -- mostly on land that should be protected for the use of the community--and reducing existing parks and nature reserves on the grounds that they are `an obstacle to development'.
This scenario may sound lunatic, but in 1994, Mike Dombeck, then-director of the BLM, proposed that the federal government could raise billions of dollars by selling off millions of acres of public land in Alaska.
* Selling off the freight division of ONR, but ensuring the Little Bear and Polar Bear Express service from Cochrane to Moosonee are maintained;
Ironically, at the same time that the Pearson subsidiary was selling off Cap Pubs properties it was purchasing Tod Sedwick's company, Pasha Publications, and its energy-related newsletters and conferences for a reported $17.8 million to beef up FTE.