Sell off

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Sell off

Sale of securities under pressure. See: Dumping.

Sell Off

The rapid sale of a security by a large number of holders. This increases the supply of the security available for sale and therefore drives down the price. Sell-offs occur for a number of reasons. A stock may drop suddenly in price if its company issues a negative earnings report, or if there are reports of a new technology rendering the company's product obsolete, or if the company's costs rise. Sell-offs also happen for other, perhaps less rational reasons. For example, a natural disaster, which may or may not affect supplies, can cause a sell-off. See also: Panic Sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trend in selling off tangible assets is one seen across England, with councils budgeting to bring in PS3.
Selling off valuable assets is not a great thing for a city to do at any time.
The Sunday Mercury recently told how cash-strapped cops had also considered selling off police stations in a desperate bid to make money.
But rival postal group TNT Post UK has claimed that selling off the Royal Mail could create a "privatised monopoly" and push up the price of stamps.
The Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE: RBS) is close to selling off its Asian assets.
Fellow Labour councillor Fred Johnson said: "They will be selling off the patches of green on the roundabouts next.
NOT long ago, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa championed selling off surplus city properties to raise as much as $80 million to offset L.
It's not like the state is selling off its own assets; it's setting off someone else's," he says.
Selling off the freight division of ONR, but ensuring the Little Bear and Polar Bear Express service from Cochrane to Moosonee are maintained;
Ironically, at the same time that the Pearson subsidiary was selling off Cap Pubs properties it was purchasing Tod Sedwick's company, Pasha Publications, and its energy-related newsletters and conferences for a reported $17.
Bastos Marques is now dumping that strategy, selling off those far-flung assets to focus on CSN's core steel business to make it bigger, meaner and more efficient in an increasingly competitive world market.
After selling off a mass of non-core activities, Adaptec Inc, the Milpitas, California-based provider of bandwidth management technology, concludes that it has completed a turnaround year.