Securities Act of 1933

(redirected from Securities Act)

Securities Act of 1933

First law designed to regulate securities markets, requiring registration of securities and disclosure.

Securities Act of 1933

Legislation in the United States that formed the first major federal regulation of the securities trade. Among other provisions, it requires companies traded under interstate commerce to register with the federal government and disclose their financial statements and other activities. Before 1934, registration and disclosure were made with the Federal Trade Commission but, following the creation of the Securities & Exchange Commission, this changed. See also: New Deal.

Securities Act of 1933

A landmark securities law intended to improve the flow of information to potential investors in new security issues and to prohibit certain selling practices relating to those issues. Issuing firms are required to register their securities with the federal government, and investment bankers must provide investors with a prospectus. Secondary issues, private offerings, and certain small issues are usually exempted from requirements of the Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Notes have not been, and will not be, registered in the United States under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the Securities Act), or the securities laws of any state of the United States and may not be offered, sold or delivered, directly or indirectly in the United States or to, or for the account or benefit of, a U.S.
The shares of common stock sold in this private placement have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or any state securities laws, and were sold in a private placement pursuant to Regulation D of the Securities Act.
The Issuer will make the offering pursuant to an exemption under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act").
The notes were offered and sold only to persons reasonably believed to be qualified institutional buyers pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act") and to non-US persons in transactions outside the United States pursuant to Regulation S under the Securities Act.
Gray noted Thursday (11/1) that theoffering will beexempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 and that the notes are being offered to finance, together with cash on hand and "anticipated debt facilities and indebtedness of
(NYSE: ALSN), has completed its offering of USD400m in aggregate principal amount of 4.750 percent Senior Notes due 2027 in a private placement exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
The Senior Notes will be offered to qualified institutional buyers pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and outside the United States pursuant to Regulation S under the Securities Act.
The offering will be made solely by means of a private placement to qualified institutional buyers pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and to certain non-U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
The notes will be offered only to qualified institutional buyers and outside the United States in accordance with Rule 144A and Regulation S, respectively, under the Securities Act of 1933.
The company has earlier offered to exchange the USD400m worth of its 6.50% Series B Notes due 2018 that have been registered under the Securities Act of 1933 for USD400m of 6.50% Series A Notes due 2018 that have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, and USD400m of 7.50% Series B Notes due 2038 that have been registered under the Securities Act of 1933 for USD400m of 7.50% Series A Notes due 2038 that have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933.
The Discount Notes were offered only to qualified institutional buyers, as defined in Rule 144A under the amended Securities Act of 1933, and certain investors outside of the United States under Regulation S under the Securities Act.

Full browser ?